Committee Members

Committee Members

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Dr. Cathy Beauchamp

Community member, former Dean of Education

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Dr. Valerio Faraoni

Full Professor – Department Chairperson

Valerio Faraoni earned a BSc in Physics (Laurea in Fisica) at the University of Pavia, Italy, and an MSc and PhD (1991) in Astrophysics under the supervision of Prof. George F.R. Ellis at the International School for Advanced Studies in Trieste, Italy (www.sissa.it). He has held various research and teaching appointments at the University of Victoria, B.C., the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, India, the Free University of Brussels, Belgium, and the University of Northern British Columbia. He came to Bishop's University in 2005, where he is currently an Associate Professor in the physics department.Contact Information
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2490

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Valerio Faraoni earned a BSc in Physics (Laurea in Fisica) at the University of Pavia, Italy, and an MSc and PhD (1991) in Astrophysics under the supervision of Prof. George F.R. Ellis at the International School for Advanced Studies in Trieste, Italy (http://www.sissa.it). He has held various research and teaching appointments at the University of Victoria, B.C., the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, India, the Free University of Brussels, Belgium, and the University of Northern British Columbia. He came to Bishop’s University in 2005, where he is currently an Associate Professor in the physics department.

Research

Theoretical Cosmology: Dark Energy and Modified Gravity

Theoretical cosmology studies the dynamics, origin, evolution, and fate of the universe, and the formation of structures (galaxies, galaxy clusters, and superclusters) in it. In 1998 it was discovered, by studying distant supernovae, that the expansion of the universe is accelerated. Many theoretical models have been proposed in order to explain this shocking discovery and they mostly fall into two classes: dark energy and modified gravity. Dark energy models assume that Einstein’s theory of gravity (general relativity) is valid and that a mysterious form of dark energy of unknown nature permeates the universe and makes up 70% of its energy content. This dark energy must necessarily have exotic properties, such as a negative pressure. The current observational data seem to require an even more negative pressure and more exotic energy (called phantom energy), which may cause the universe to end at a finite time in the future in a Big Rip singularity (the end of time), in which all bound objects-galaxies, planets, humans, atoms-are ripped apart by increasing gravitational forces. If phantom energy is really fuelling the cosmic acceleration, we probably have to abandon Einstein’s general relativity in favour of alternative gravity theories such as, for example, scalar-tensor gravity, a generalization of Einstein’s theory motivated by string/M-theories. The latter attempt to unify gravity with the other three fundamental forces, a goal known as “the holy grail of theoretical physics”.

The second class of models, modified gravity, does not require exotic dark energy but instead modifies Einstein’s relativity with corrections that only affect large (cosmological) scales.

Dr. Faraoni’s research explores both classes of models, trying to fully understand their dynamics, explain the cosmic acceleration, develop models that are theoretically consistent and compatible with available experiments, study their predictions (e.g., will the universe accelerate forever? Will it end in a Big Rip?) and related issues such as the production of gravitational waves, or the accretion of phantom energy onto black holes or wormholes. Long term goals include the development of the correct theory of gravity (it is possible that departures from Einstein’s gravity are unobservable at the small Solar System scales but are already observed in the cosmic acceleration), finding out if dark energy actually exists and, if so, determining precisely its strange properties, understanding the early universe and obtaining information, otherwise inaccessible on Earth, on the high energy physics that left an imprint in the cosmic microwave background and in the distribution of galaxies and galaxy clusters.

Other recent interests include the study of black holes embedded in a cosmological background and the foundations and possible violations of the Equivalence Principle (the basis of relativistic gravity) in high energy physics.

Dr. Faraoni collaborates with various researchers worldwide on the subjects above and is involved in establishing an international research network on modified gravity.

Details on his research and an up-to-date list of publications can be found at http://www.slac.stanford.edu

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Dr. Trevor Gulliver

Associate Professor

B.A. (Trent), M.A. (Leicester), Ph.D. (Ottawa)Dr. Gulliver became a professor in the School of Education in 2009. Before coming to Bishop's, he taught English as a Second Language in South Korea and Canada and worked on numerous language teacher professional development projects with teachers from around the world. He is excited to be involved in the growth of the new BA Double Major in English Second Language Teaching and Secondary Education offered through the School of Education.Dr. Gulliver is interested in issues of power and identity in language learning and teaching. His doctoral research explored constructions of national identity in ESL textbooks used in Canada.Contact Information
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2930

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B.A. (Trent), M.A. (Leicester), Ph.D. (Ottawa)

Dr. Gulliver became a professor in the School of Education in 2009. Before coming to Bishop’s, he taught English as a Second Language in South Korea and Canada and worked on numerous language teacher professional development projects with teachers from around the world. He is excited to be involved in the growth of the new BA Double Major in English Second Language Teaching and Secondary Education offered through the School of Education.

Dr. Gulliver is interested in issues of power and identity in language learning and teaching. His doctoral research explored constructions of national identity in ESL textbooks used in Canada.

Research

My research applies insights and methods from critical discourse analysis to examine constructions of group identity in texts used in the education of new Canadians or citizenship education.

My doctoral research explored discursive constructions of Canadian identity in English as a Second Language textbooks intended for adult newcomers to Canada and used in government-funded language instruction. Through critical discourse analysis of these textbooks, I explored the ways in which these texts construct positive self-presentations of Canada while often marginally positioning multicultural others within this imagined Canada.

With the support of a grant from the Bishop’s University Senate Research Committee, my current research on immigrant success stories attempts to draw stories from multiple sources to see how national identity is discursively constructed. TESOL Quarterly, an international journal for the field of language teaching, published an article that emerged from my doctoral research in which I explored the constructions of nation in immigrant success stories.

The Canadian Journal of Education/Revue canadienne de L’éducation, a leading education journal in Canada, published an article in which I explored the ways in which nation is constantly flagged in ESL textbooks. My research into banal flaggings differs from that of other researchers as I explore pedagogical texts in which the flag is both taught and reproduced banally.

I continue to be an active member of the Citizenship Education Research Network, special interest group associated with the Canadian Society for Studies in Education where I explore constructions of “Canadians” in government study guides.

Recent Publications

Refereed contributions:

Gulliver, T. (2011). Banal nationalism in ESL textbooks. Canadian Journal of Education, 34(3), 116-135.

Gulliver, T. (2011). Framing Canadians in Two Citizenship Study Guides. CERN’s Peer Reviewed Collection 2011.

Gulliver, T. (2010). Immigrant Success Stories in ESL Textbooks. TESOL Quarterly 44(4), 725-745.

Conference presentations:

Gulliver, T. (May 27, 2012). The Militarization of Canadian Citizenship and Immigration. Presented at the 40th Annual Conference of the Canadian Society for the Study of Education.

Gulliver, T. (November 12, 2011). Digging Deeper: Move Beyond a Comprehension Approach with Form-Focussed Listening. Presented at the Annual Conference of the Société pour la promotion de l’enseignement de l’anglais seconde au Québec.

Gulliver, T. (November 13, 2011). Get in the Game. Presented at the Annual Conference of the Société pour la promotion de l’enseignement de l’anglais seconde au Québec.

Gulliver, T. (May 30, 2011). Framing Canadians in Two Citizenship Study Guides. Presented at the 39th Annual Conference of the Canadian Society for the Study of Education.

Gulliver, T. (April 28, 2011). Appraising Bilingualism. Presented at Evaluation in a Context of Individual and Global Mobility, the 4th Annual Conference of The Canadian Centre for Studies and Research in Bilingualism and Language Planning.

Gulliver, T. (April 8, 2011). Policing the Borders in Language Textbooks. Presented at Language Without Borders Conference for Second Language Educators.

Gulliver, T. (November 13, 2010). Creativity in Every Class. Presented at the Annual Conference of the Société pour la promotion de l’enseignement de l’anglais seconde au Québec.

Gulliver, T. (May 29, 2010). Feigning Dialogicality in Immigrant Success Stories. Presented at the 37th Annual Conference of the Canadian Society for the Study of Education.

Gulliver, T. & Kreuger, B. (April 30, 2010). Preparing Student Teachers for Linguistic Diversity in Québec. Presented at Individual Plurilingualism and Multilingual Communities in the Context of Official Bilingualism, the 3rd Annual Conference of The Canadian Centre for Studies and Research in Bilingualism and Language Planning.

Gulliver, T. (May 23, 2009). English as a Second Language Textbooks and Banal Nationalism. Presented at the 37th Annual Conference of the Canadian Society for the Study of Education.

Gulliver, T. (June 19, 2008). ‘Most Canadians’: Making the Canadian Normal. Presented at Bilingualism in a Plurilingual Canada, the Inaugural Colloquium of the Canadian Centre for Studies and Research in Bilingualism and Language Planning.

Gulliver, T. (May 31, 2008). Legitimating ‘the Canadian Way of Life’. Presented at the TESL Canada Conference, 2008: Uncovering Discourse.

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Dr. Corinne Haigh

Associate Professor – Dean of the School of Education

B.A. (Mount Allison), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Western Ontario)Dr. Haigh became a professor in the School of Education in 2010. She received her B.A. (Hons.) in Psychology from Mount Allison University and then went on to complete her graduate work at the University of Western Ontario, in the areas of Educational and Cognitive Psychology. She recently completed a postdoctoral fellowship at McGill University and the Centre for Research on Language, Mind, and Brain, where she led a project investigating literacy development in elementary school students in French Immersion programs, with a particular emphasis on children at-risk for difficulty with decoding, reading comprehension, or a combination of these skills.…Contact Information
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2401

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B.A. (Mount Allison), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Western Ontario)

Dr. Haigh became a professor in the School of Education in 2010. She received her B.A. (Hons.) in Psychology from Mount Allison University and then went on to complete her graduate work at the University of Western Ontario, in the areas of Educational and Cognitive Psychology. She recently completed a postdoctoral fellowship at McGill University and the Centre for Research on Language, Mind, and Brain, where she led a project investigating literacy development in elementary school students in French Immersion programs, with a particular emphasis on children at-risk for difficulty with decoding, reading comprehension, or a combination of these skills. Dr. Haigh teaches in the area of special needs education, and gives courses on individual differences, educational psychology and the psychology of reading.

 

Research

My main area of research investigates cross-linguistic aspects of language processing in bilinguals. I have examined individual differences in language and literacy development in school-aged children enrolled in bilingual education programs. The particular focus of this work is on reading development, and more specifically on reading comprehension skills. I have recently extended this work to investigate naturally occurring reading comprehension strategy instruction in the L1 and L2 classroom at the upper elementary school level, and the relationship between this strategy instruction and L1 and L2 reading comprehension outcomes. I eventually hope to broaden this program of research to include an investigation of early intervention initiatives for students at-risk for reading difficulty in second language programs, with a particular focus on reading comprehension. I am also interested in issues related to motivation, engagement and achievement in male and female readers during classroom based literacy activities. My earlier work investigated how the interaction of sound information from both of a bilingual’s languages interacts during silent word reading word reading.

Recent Research Initiatives:

L’enseignement de stratégies naturelles dans les classes de langue maternelle et de langue seconde : les conséquences sur l’évaluation du rendement en lecture des élèves du troisième cycle du primaire (2014-2017) – funded by a Fonds de recherche sur la société et la culture (FRQSC) Établissement de nouveaux professeurs-chercheurs grant ($39,475)

Reading comprehension is an essential academic skill, and also an area of specific difficulty for about 10% of upper elementary school students, and many students reading in a second language. To improve comprehension, students must develop a repertoire of comprehension strategies specific to their needs. In order to support all students, it is necessary to have a clear understanding of the types of strategy instruction that naturally occur in both the upper elementary grades. The proposed research project has four primary objectives: (1) To provide a descriptive analysis of naturally occurring reading comprehension strategy instruction in both L1 and L2 classrooms; (2) To determine whether the amount and type of strategy instruction are associated with strategy use, and specific comprehension skills; (3) To examine the relationships between strategy variables and reading comprehension performance; and (4) To investigate the within- and cross-language concurrent predictors of L1 and L2 reading comprehension. Pairs of English Language Arts and French Second Language teachers at the same school and grade level (4 and 5) will be recruited, and their lessons will be videotaped once a week, for a period of 6 weeks. Students will participate in the group administration reading comprehension and comprehension strategy use measures, and individual sessions involving reading, language, and nonverbal intelligence measures. The results of this study will inform individualized reading comprehension interventions and allow for the creation of professional development programs for teachers that are based in their current classroom practice.

Le développement de la compétence à écrire en langue première et seconde à la fin du primaire dans des contextes d’intensification de l’enseignement de la langue seconde (2014-2017) – funded by a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Insight grant ($251,230)

Research team: Olivier Dezutter (principal investigator), Lynn Thomas, Véronique Parent (University of Sherbrooke), Corinne Haigh and Sunny Man Chu Lau (Bishop’s University) and Cécile Sabatier (Simon Fraser University).

In Quebec, an increasingly large number of French and English primary schools offer intensive second language (L2) teaching. Several studies demonstrate the positive impact of the implementation of these intensive education or immersion models tested in other provinces. However, the implementation of such models represents a challenge for teachers. For the general public, these models may raise a number of concerns, in particular about the impact of second language learning on competency in the language of instruction, and opportunities for students with learning difficulties to take full advantage of these intensive models of second language education.

The study focuses in particular on the conditions necessary for the development of writing skills in both the language of instruction and in second language contexts involving an intensification of L2 instruction. It aims to better understand how students in both the anglophone and francophone sectors exposed to various models of second language instruction in the school context (intensive, immersion or enriched program), develop their writing skills over the course of one school year in both their second language and the language of instruction.

Individual differences in second language reading acquisition: A longitudinal study of English-speaking students in French immersion programs (2007-present) – funded in 2011-2014 by a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Insight Development grant ($70,228)

French immersion programs were first created in order to provide anglophone children residing in Quebec with enhanced opportunities to become bilingual in English and French within the context of public schooling (Lambert & Tucker, 1972; Genesee, 1987). Research has shown that early immersion students attain the same levels of reading achievement in English as native English-speaking students in English language programs, and that they attain a level of proficiency in all aspects of French as a second language that is superior to that of English-speaking students who receive language arts instruction in French for short periods each day (Genesee, 2004). However, there is relatively little empirical investigation of individual differences in achievement among immersion students and, in particular, individual differences in reading achievement. Learning to read is critical for ensuring academic success in school because beyond the primary grades reading is essential for learning academic subject matter and skills. Studying reading development is equally, if not more, important, in immersion because, despite the overall success of students in reading achievement, there is a high rate of attrition from immersion programs, in part at least, due to reading difficulty (e.g., Halsall, 1994; Hogan & Harris, 2004; Obadia & Thériault, 1997; Parkin, Morrison & Watkin, 1987). We have virtually no evidence on the performance of students at-risk for reading difficulty in immersion programs, and to date no study has monitored the reading development of immersion students into the upper elementary school years.

This research project aims to answer the following questions:

  • How accurately and reliably do predictors based on first language (L1) abilities collected in kindergarten predict individual differences in second language (L2) reading achievement in immersion students in grade 6?
  • Do the same L1 predictors that predicted L2 reading achievement in grades 1-3 predict reading achievement in grade 6? Do the predictors of L2 reading comprehension outcomes in immersion students change as students’ reading skills progress from grade 3 to grade 6?
  • Are anglophone students who are at-risk for reading impairment at greater risk in French immersion programs than in English language programs?

Students who struggle with reading are often counselled out of French immersion programs. This may put these students at a disadvantage later on in life, as they will not be proficient in both English and French. However, counselling them to remain in immersion requires the provision of a full range of support services that meet their specific needs. At present, most schools are not equipped to provide such services, and researchers lack empirical evidence to advise schools on the best course of action. Results from this project will offer educators, policy makers, and parents a better understanding of the profiles of strength and need exhibited by children at-risk for reading difficulty in immersion programs and will allow schools to make more informed judgments on such matters.

Collectif de recherche sur la continuité des apprentissages en lecture et en écriture (Collectif CLÉ) (2012- present) – funded in 2012-2014 by a Fonds de recherche sur la société et la culture (FRQSC) Soutien aux équipes de recherche grant ($349,076)

I am part of a multi-institutional research team, chaired by researchers at l’Université de Sherbrooke,  with the goal of conducting  original research on the theme of reading and writing development, bringing together experts from different disciplines such as first language, second language, and/or foreign language teaching, psychology, special education, linguistics, and literary studies. Research revolves around three axes: Axis 1 – Continuity through different levels education; Axis 2 – The continuity between various languages and school subjects; Axis 3 – The continuity between backgrounds and learning contexts (formal and informal).

Recent Publications

Refereed contributions:

Erdos, C., Genesee, F., Savage, R., & Haigh, C. A. (2014). Predicting risk for oral and written language learning difficulties in students educated in a second language. Applied Psycholinguistics, 35(2), 371-398.

Genesee, F., Savage, R., Erdos, E., & Haigh, C. A. (2013). Identification of reading difficulties in students schooled in a second language. In Gathercole, V. (Ed.). Bilinguals and assessment: State of the art guide to issues and solutions from around the world. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.

Newman, R. L., Jared, D., & Haigh, C. A. (2012). Does phonology play a role when skilled readers read high frequency words? Evidence from ERPs. Language & Cognitive Processes, 27(9), 1361-1384. doi:10.1080/01690965.2011.603932.

Haigh, C. A., Savage, R., Erdos, C., & Genesee, F. (2011). The role of phoneme and onset-rime awareness in second language reading acquisition. Journal of Research in Reading, 34(1), 94-113. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9817.2010.01475.x

Erdos, C., Genesee, F., Savage, R., & Haigh, C. A. (2011). Individual differences in second language reading outcomes. International Journal of Bilingualism, 15(1), 3-25. doi:10.1177/1367006910371022.

Haigh, C. A., & Jared, D. (2007). The activation of phonological representations by bilinguals while reading silently: Evidence from interlingual homophones. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 33, 623-644.

Non-refereed contributions:

Genesee, F., Haigh, C. A., & Erdos, C. (2009). Apprendre à lire dans le cadre des programmes d’immersion en français: Reconnaître les élèves qui ont davantage besoin d’aide. Réflexions, 28, 18-22.

Conference presentations:

Erdos, C., & Haigh, C. A. (2013, March). Comment identifier et intervenir auprès des élèves anglophones qui sont à risque de présenter des problèmes de lecture et qui fréquentent des programmes d’immersion français. Workshop presented at the 38e Congrès annuel de l’AQETA, Montreal, Quebec.

Haigh, C. A., Erdos, C., Genesee, F., & Savage (2012, July). Predicting risk for oral and written language learning difficulties in English-speaking students in French Immersion programs. Paper presented at the Nineteenth Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading, Montreal, QC.

Haigh, C. A., & Erdos, C. (2012, February). Identifying and helping English-speaking French Immersion students who are at-risk for reading difficulties. Workshop presented at the 2012 Annual Conference of the Leadership Committee for English Education in Quebec (LCEEQ), Laval, QC.

Haigh, C. A., Savage, R., Erdos, C., & Genesee, F. (2011, July). The role of phoneme and onset-rime awareness in second language reading acquisition. Poster presented at the Eighteenth Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading, St. Pete Beach, FL.

Haigh, C. A., Erdos, C., Genesee, F., & Savage, R. (2011, April). Individual differences in language and literacy outcomes in English-speaking students in French immersion programs. Poster presented at the 2011 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Montreal, Quebec.

Erdos, C., Genesee, F., Savage, R., & Haigh, C. A. (2010, June). Individual differences in typically-developing and at-risk readers in French immersion. Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Canadian Association of Applied Linguistics, Montreal, Quebec.

Haigh, C. A., Erdos, C., Genesee, F., & Savage, R. (2010, May). Indices de troubles de la lecture et de troubles du langage oral chez des élèves anglophones scolarisés dans un programme d’immersion française. Paper presented at the 78th Congress of the Association francophone pour le savoir (ACFAS).

Mercier, J., Pivneva, I., Haigh, C. A., & Titone, D. A. (2009, November). Individual differences in executive function affect spoken word recognition. Paper presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Boston, Massachusetts.

Haigh, C. A., Erdos, C., Genesee, F., & Savage, R. (2009, July). Individual differences in L2 literacy outcomes in English-speaking students in French immersion programs. Paper presented at the 7th International Symposium on Bilingualism, Utrecht, Netherlands.

Haigh, C. A., Erdos, C., Genesee, F., & Savage, R. (2009, June). Individual differences in L2 literacy outcomes in English-speaking students in French immersion programs. Poster presented at the Sixteenth Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading, Boston, MA.

Haigh, C. A., Erdos, C., Genesee, F., & Savage, R. (2009, June). Individual differences in literacy outcomes in French immersion students. Poster presented at the National Conference on Bilingualism and Biliteracy Development: Contextualizing Bilingualism and Biliteracy, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Haigh, C. A., Erdos, C., Genesee, F., & Savage, R. (2009, May). Individual differences in L2 language and literacy outcomes in English-speaking students in French immersion programs. Paper presented at the “Language Immersion as Formal and Informal Learning: New Perspectives for Research and Public Policy” Conference, The Canadian Center for Studies and Research on Bilingualism and Language Planning, Ottawa, Ontario.

Haigh, C. A., & Jared, D. (2008, October). Phonological priming effects in bilinguals. Paper presented at the International Conference on Models of Interaction in Bilinguals, Bangor, Wales.

Jared, D., Friesen, D. C., & Haigh, C. A. (2008, October). Cross-language phonological activation in bilingual word naming. Paper presented at the International Conference on Models of Interaction in Bilinguals, Bangor, Wales.

Erdos, C., Genesee, F., Savage, R., & Haigh, C. A. (2008, June). Predictors of reading and language impairment in majority language second language learners. Paper presented at the 32nd Annual International Academy for Research in Learning Disabilities Conference, Toronto, Ontario.

Erdos, C., Genesee, F., Savage, R., & Haigh, C. A. (2008, June). Individual differences in L2 language and literacy outcomes in English-speaking students in French immersion programs. Paper presented at the “Bilingualism in a Plurilingual Canada: Research and Implications” Conference, Official Languages and Bilingualism Institute, Ottawa, Ontario.

Newman, R. L., Jared, D., & Haigh, C. A. (2007, November). The role of phonology in the activation of word meaning: Evidence from event-related brain potentials. Poster presented at the 48th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Long Beach, California.

Invited talks:

Haigh, C. A., & Erdos, C. (2014, October). Identifying and helping elementary school age second language learners who are at-risk for reading difficulties. Workshop presented at the 2014 Advancing Learning in Differentiation and Inclusion (ALDI) Symposium, Pointe-Claire, QC.

Haigh, C. A., & Erdos, C. (2014, March). Identifying and helping elementary-school students who are instructed in a second language: Disentangling true reading difficulty from reading delay due to incomplete second language acquisition. Workshop presented at the first annual First Nations Education Council (FNEC) Reading Symposium, St-Sauveur, QC.

Haigh, C. A., Erdos, C. E., Genesee, F., & Savage, R. (2012, December). Apprendre à lire dans une langue seconde: Reconnaître les élèves qui ont davantage besoin d’aide. Paper presented at the Journée d’étude du Collectif CLÉ: Lire-écrire entre les langues, Sherbrooke, Quebec.

Erdos, C., Genesee, F., & Haigh, C. A. (2010, May). At-risk students and French immersion. Paper presented at the Heritage Canada Second-Language Learning Research Round Table, Ottawa, Ontario.

Erdos, C., Genesee, F., & Haigh, C. A. (2008, November). Comment identifier les élèves en immersion qui présentent des difficultés en lecture? Comment les aider? Paper presented at the 2008 Congrès annuel de l’Association des professeurs d’immersion, Ottawa, Ontario.

Haigh, C. A., Erdos, C., Genesee, F., & Savage, R. (2008, October). Students with academic challenges in FSL programs. Paper presented at the 2008 Annual Meeting of Canadian Parents for French, Ottawa, Ontario.

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Ms. Catherine Lavallee-Welch

University Librarian

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Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2483

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Dr. Heather Lawford

Associate Professor

B.A (Trent) M.A (Wilfrid Laurier) Ph.D (Concordia)Heather Lawford joined the Psychology Department in 2012. Her research examines the ways in which youth are able to reach their full potential and make meaningful contributions to their community. She is also interested in a narrative life-story approach to psychology. That is, she seeks to understand how the stories we tell about ourselves shape who we are and who we become. Prior to her arrival at Bishop’s, Heather completed a post-doctoral fellowship through Brock University and the Centre of Excellence in Youth Engagement where she engaged in research projects in collaboration with youth and with community organizations.…Contact Information
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2194

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B.A (Trent) M.A (Wilfrid Laurier) Ph.D (Concordia)

Heather Lawford joined the Psychology Department in 2012. Her research examines the ways in which youth are able to reach their full potential and make meaningful contributions to their community. She is also interested in a narrative life-story approach to psychology. That is, she seeks to understand how the stories we tell about ourselves shape who we are and who we become. Prior to her arrival at Bishop’s, Heather completed a post-doctoral fellowship through Brock University and the Centre of Excellence in Youth Engagement where she engaged in research projects in collaboration with youth and with community organizations.

Publications list available on Google Scholar.

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Ms. Eliza McKnight

Reference Librarian, TLC Vice Chairperson

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Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2802

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Prof. Scosha Merovitz

Special Instructor

Coordinator of the Math-Stats help centerContact Information
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2722

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Coordinator of the Math-Stats help center

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Dr. Daniel Miller

Associate Professor – Department Chairperson

Daniel Miller is Associate Professor, teaching courses in Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, comparative world religions and Biblical Hebrew. He received his PhD in Near Eastern Studies from the University of Michigan. His research areas are Canaanite-Israelite cultic practices, and ancient West Semitic magic. He is currently working on a book on magic in ancient Israelite society.Contact Information
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2378

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Daniel Miller is Associate Professor, teaching courses in Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, comparative world religions and Biblical Hebrew. He received his PhD in Near Eastern Studies from the University of Michigan. His research areas are Canaanite-Israelite cultic practices, and ancient West Semitic magic. He is currently working on a book on magic in ancient Israelite society.

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Dr. Michele Murray

Full Professor – Dean of Arts and Science

Michele Murray is Professor in the Religion department. She teaches courses in Christian origins, women in religion, and religion and film. She obtained her M.A. from Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Second Temple period Jewish history, and her Ph.D. in Religion from the University of Toronto. Her research areas are Jewish-Christian relations in the ancient world, and interaction among Eastern Mediterranean religions in late antiquity. Dr. Murray is serving as Dean of Arts and Science for 2014–18.Contact Information
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2737

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Michele Murray is Professor in the Religion department. She teaches courses in Christian origins, women in religion, and religion and film. She obtained her M.A. from Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Second Temple period Jewish history, and her Ph.D. in Religion from the University of Toronto. Her research areas are Jewish-Christian relations in the ancient world, and interaction among Eastern Mediterranean religions in late antiquity. Dr. Murray is serving as Dean of Arts and Science for 2014–18.

Research

The Magical Female: Women and Magic in Jewish and Christian Communities of Late Antiquity

There has been much research directed toward women and magic in the Middle Ages, however studies focusing on women and magic in the first few centuries of the Common Era tend to be rare. Dr. Murray’s research concentrates on the important, yet largely neglected area of women and magic in Jewish and Christian communities of late antiquity. She focuses on the regions of Syria-Palestine and western Asia Minor during the first four centuries of the Common Era, areas that were home to Jewish communities and early Christian churches. Her project will explore literary evidence and archaeological realia (incantations, curse tablets, amulets and inscriptions) pertaining to magical practices in these geographical areas.

“The Magical Female” project studies two main issues: the ideology about women and the practice of magic, and the actual practice of magic by women. The ideology will address questions such as:

  • What did Jewish and Christian writers write and think about women’s relationship to ritual power?
  • What stereotypes of women are reflected in these sources?
  • Were women understood to practice magic differently than men?
  • What types of women are described as engaging in magic?

The actual practice of magic by women will address questions such as:

  • How did some women employ ritual practices to gain power?
  • What types of magical rituals are associated with females?
  • What does material culture, such as curse tablets and amulets, reveal about women’s participation in such rituals?

Dr. Murray’s objective is to advance knowledge on the broad topic of religion and magic in late antiquity, and to contribute to the more specific area of women’s religious and ritual practices in early Christianity and post-biblical Judaism.

Michele on Roman Road in Syria

Nabatean Private Cults

Dr. Murray in JordanDr. Murray and Mohammad Dashan (a Bedouin), Dr. Murray’s current research project brings together her interest in investigating literary evidence and archaeological realia for insight into ancient religious practice. Scholarly attention has been drawn of late to the importance of studying adaptive religious structures in the Roman world, particularly evidence reflecting architectural modification of the private home for cultic use. Analysis of the various stages of renovation of ancient buildings imparts important social evidence regarding the status and circumstances of religious communities. Dr. Murray’s goal is to explore the religious activities of ancient Nabatean people; more specifically, she wishes to examine whether a large Nabatean housing complex, recently unearthed at Wadi Ath-Thamad, Jordan, reflects evidence of architectural renovation for cultic purposes.

In the first century CE, the Nabateans, a Semitic tribespeople, controlled more than 1000 sites throughout the Mediterranean, particularly dominating the trade routes of the Arabian Peninsula. They were a wealthy people who secured the sources and markets or the profitable frankincense and myrrh trade and added to this spices, gems, balsams, bitumen, and, eventually, even the China silk trade. Petra, located in modern-day Jordan, was their urban capital. This strikingly beautiful city contained an oversized theatre, public bath, temples, and more than 800 rock-carved funerary monuments.

This project entails both textual analysis and the study of archaeological data. For the textual analysis, Dr. Murray will investigate Roman, Jewish, and Christian sources from the Late Antiquity for information regarding Nabatean religious practices. The archaeological component of the project requires that Dr. Murray gather all available excavation reports on Nabatean communities and, centrally to the project, participate in the Canadian-led archaeological excavation at Wadi Ath-Thamad, Jordan.

Photo: Dr. Murray and Mohammad Dashan (a Bedouin), participating to the archaeological dig at Wadi Ath-Thamad, Jordan, summer 2004.

Publications

A. Books

Playing a Jewish Game: Gentile Christian Judaizers in the First and Second Centuries C.E. (Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2004).

B. Articles

“The First Letter of John” in The Jewish Annotated New Testament, 2nd Edition, eds. Amy-Jill Levine and Marc Zvi Brettler (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017), 518-526.

“Romans 2 Within the Broader Context of Gentile Judaizing in Early Christianity,” in The So-Called Jew in Paul’s Letter to the Romans, eds., Rafael Rodriguez and Matthew Thiessen (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2016), 163-182.

“Jewish Traditions” in World Religions, eds., Willard Oxtoby, Amir Hussain and Roy C. Amore (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014), pp. 74-147 to “Jewish Traditions” in World Religions, eds., Willard Oxtoby, Amir Hussain and Roy C. Amore (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014), pp. 74-147.

“The First Letter of John” in The Jewish Annotated New Testament, eds. Amy-Jill Levine and Marc Zvi Brettler (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011), 448-455.

“Religion and the Nomadic Lifestyle: The Nabateans” in Travel and Religion in Antiquity, ed., Philip A. Harland (Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2011): pp. 215-234.

“Female Corporeality, Magic, and Gender in the Babylonian Talmud,” Religion & Theology 15, no 3&4 (2008): pp.199-224.

“The Magical Female in Greco-Roman Rabbinic Literature” Religion and Theology 14, no. 3&4 (2007), pp. 284-309.

“Christian Identity in the Apostolic Constitutions: Some Observations” in Identity & Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean: Jews, Christians and Others, eds. Zeba Crook and Philip Harland (Sheffield Phoenix Press, 2007), pp. 179-194.

C. Book Reviews

Abortion and the Apostolate: A Study in Pauline Conversion, Rhetoric, and Scholarship, Matthew W. Mitchell, Biblical Quarterly Review 2011

The Mind Behind the Gospels, Herbert W. Basser in Shofar 2011

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Dr. Jessica Riddell

Associate Professor, 3M National Teaching Fellow (2015), TLC Chairperson

Dr. Jessica Riddell is the inaugural Stephen A. Jarislowsky Chair of Undergraduate Teaching Excellence at Bishop’s University. In this capacity, she explores innovative teaching and learning practices, creates mentorship opportunities for students and faculty, mobilizes knowledge around learning in higher education (with a particular focus on the humanities), enhances professional development initiatives for her colleagues, and participates in a wide range of visioning and consultations at the national and international levels. She is the VP Canada on the Board of ISSoTL (International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning) as well as a Board member for the 3M National Executive Council.…Contact Information
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2392

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Dr. Jessica Riddell is the inaugural Stephen A. Jarislowsky Chair of Undergraduate Teaching Excellence at Bishop’s University. In this capacity, she explores innovative teaching and learning practices, creates mentorship opportunities for students and faculty, mobilizes knowledge around learning in higher education (with a particular focus on the humanities), enhances professional development initiatives for her colleagues, and participates in a wide range of visioning and consultations at the national and international levels. She is the VP Canada on the Board of ISSoTL (International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning) as well as a Board member for the 3M National Executive Council. Dr. Riddell is the faculty columnist of University Affairs and her articles appear in a series called “Adventures in Academe.” She is also an Associate Professor and the Chair of the English Department at Bishop’s University, as well as the Chair of the Teaching and Learning Centre. Her disciplinary research theorizes that sixteenth-century drama provides well-documented intersections between politics, performance, and power. Her recent SSHRC Insight Development Grant enabled her to investigate how technologies in the sixteenth century (the printing press, illuminated manuscripts, heraldic scrolls, portraits) recorded and shaped identity and gender, especially pertaining to political leadership in Elizabeth I’s court. Dr. Riddell was awarded the 3M National Teaching Fellowship in 2015, the first recipient of the award at Bishop’s University. She was also awarded the William and Nancy Turner Award for Teaching Excellence (2011-2012), the most prestigious recognition of teaching excellence at Bishop’s. Dr. Riddell earned her MA and PhD in English Literature from Queen’s University.

Research

Dr. Riddell’s research interests encompass late medieval and early modern literature, performance and ritual theory, and the articulations of subjecthood in courtly and civic drama from the fifteenth to the seventeenth century. Her recent work has examined early Tudor representations of sovereignty in theatrical, visual, and verbal forms in order to argue that there is significant and strategic generic experimentation in the recording of royal, aristocratic, and civic spectacle – spectacle designed to advance the political agendas of the monarch, the aristocracy, and the civic authorities. She is currently working on a book length project on Elizabeth I that probes 1) the manner in which the queen and her male courtiers commissioned innovative and hybrid genres; 2) the representational strategies within these genres by means of which gender is contested and re-formed; and 3) the modes of dissemination of these hybrid performance-texts (i.e. manuscript and print). By examining how performance is textualized in these new genres, Dr. Riddell’s work attempts to expose the tensions animating the often fraught relationships among the Queen, her nobility, and the civic populace.

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Dr. Jerald Sabin

Assistant Professor

Dr. Jerald Sabin earned a doctorate in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto in 2016. His research interests include identity politics, Canadian politics and public administration, Canadian political development, and the politics of Northern Canada.Sabin was a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Political Science at Western University (2017-2018) and a Research Associate with the Carleton Centre for Community Innovation at Carleton University (2009-2018). He holds a Bachelor of Public Affairs and Policy Management from the Arthur Kroeger College of Public Affairs and a Master of Arts (Public Administration) from the School of Public Policy and Administration at Carleton University.…Contact Information
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Dr. Jerald Sabin earned a doctorate in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto in 2016. His research interests include identity politics, Canadian politics and public administration, Canadian political development, and the politics of Northern Canada.

Sabin was a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Political Science at Western University (2017-2018) and a Research Associate with the Carleton Centre for Community Innovation at Carleton University (2009-2018). He holds a Bachelor of Public Affairs and Policy Management from the Arthur Kroeger College of Public Affairs and a Master of Arts (Public Administration) from the School of Public Policy and Administration at Carleton University.

Sabin is the winner of the 2015 John McMenemy Prize for best article in the Canadian Journal of Political Science, titled “Contested Colonialism: Responsible Government and Political Development in Yukon.”

For more information on Dr. Sabin’s publications and research, please visit: jeraldsabin.ca.

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SRC VP Academic

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Mr. Scott Stoddard

Manager – IT Support Services

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Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2738

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Dr. Michael Teed

Full Professor

Dr. Mike Teed is a full professor for the Williams School of Business in the field of Human Resources.  He has completed his Ph.D in Industrial and Organizational Psychology at Saint Mary’s University. He is extremely passionate about teaching and has also garnered experience as a Human Resource consultant in a variety of public and private organizations.  His research interests include workplace aggression and violence, occupational stress, and leadership.

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Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2908

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Dr. Mike Teed is a full professor for the Williams School of Business in the field of Human Resources.  He has completed his Ph.D in Industrial and Organizational Psychology at Saint Mary’s University. He is extremely passionate about teaching and has also garnered experience as a Human Resource consultant in a variety of public and private organizations.  His research interests include workplace aggression and violence, occupational stress, and leadership.

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Dr. Catherine Tracy

Associate Professor

Dr. Catherine Tracy completed her BA and MA in Classics at Dalhousie University, and her PhD at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. Her current area of research is popular politics in the late Roman Republic. At Bishop's University she coordinates a series of Classics lectures by visiting scholars, and the Humanities Lecture Series which involves evening talks by members of the Bishop's faculty. She teaches courses on ancient democracy, Roman history, sex and gender in the Greek and Roman worlds, and the Latin and Greek languages.Contact Information
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2877

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Dr. Catherine Tracy completed her BA and MA in Classics at Dalhousie University, and her PhD at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. Her current area of research is popular politics in the late Roman Republic. At Bishop’s University she coordinates a series of Classics lectures by visiting scholars, and the Humanities Lecture Series which involves evening talks by members of the Bishop’s faculty. She teaches courses on ancient democracy, Roman history, sex and gender in the Greek and Roman worlds, and the Latin and Greek languages.

Research

Roman Political and Social Strategies

Dr. Tracy’s current research focuses on the strategies employed by political agents in the Roman Republic.  This includes the political decisions of the ordinary Roman voters, whose behaviour can be accessed indirectly through the published speeches, letters, and treatises of the politician Marcus Tullius Cicero.  Cicero’s populism has tended to be ignored since, in his published writing, he tried to conceal the precarious hold he had on elite political support, and to conceal his efforts to appeal to the mass of urban and rural voters.  Dr Tracy’s work focuses on Cicero’s real dependence on popular support, and thereby adds more evidence to the “democracy debate” that has interested historians of the Roman republic for the last 20 years.  Dr Tracy’s theoretical approach involves Rational Choice Theory and Game Theory as methods for understanding and evaluating the behaviour of the various political agents of Republic Rome.

She has a forthcoming article entitled “Constantia: Cicero’s Practical Philosophy” (within a collection entitled “Cicero’s Practical Philosophy”, University of Notre Dame Press 2008) that discusses the ways in which Cicero responded to the popular requirements of being a successful politician, and how he then explained and justified such populist activity within the elite context of philosophical debate.  She is also working on a study of the power of non-voting urban crowds in Roman politics (“Who Were the Quirites? The Composition of Contio Audiences”, presented in oral form at the American Philological Association conference in January 2008).

A study of Roman adoption, which relates to her interest in social and political strategies, is also in progress.  Romans used the artificial creation and dissolution of kinship ties to allow the male head of household (the “pater familias”) to control his property and his name.  While not unaware of the reality of blood ties, they privileged the laws of adoption to an extraordinary degree.  An adopted son acquired all the rights and responsibilities of a genetic son (and could supersede a genetic son if the pater familias chose).  At an inferior social level, freed slaves also acquired their ex-masters’ names.  A pater familias of sufficient wealth and position thus overcame the limitations of ordinary procreation, which thereby freed him from dependence on the reproductive powers of his legitimate wife.  The link between patriarchy and adoption is therefore important in understanding Roman social and political relations.

Publications

(Forthcoming) “Constantia: Cicero’s Practical Philosophy” in Walter Nicgorski [ed.] Cicero’s Practical Philosophy (University of Notre Dame Press, 2008)

Papers presented:

“Who Were the Quirites? The Composition of Contio Audiences” at the American Philological Association (APA), Chicago, IL, January 2008

“What Did Cicero Ever Do For the Romans?” at the Classical Association of Canada (CAC), St. John’s, NL, May 2007

“Rhetorical Reciprocity in Cicero’s Populist Speeches” as part of Bishop’s University “Research Week”, Sherbrooke, QC, March 2007

“The Influence of Cicero’s Politics on his Philosophy” at a symposium called “Cicero’s Practical Philosophy” at the University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana, October 2006

“The Optimate Stance: Why Cicero Claimed to Despise the People” at the CAC, Banff, AB, May 2005

“Cicero’s Inadvertent Honesty and the Power of the People” at the CAC, Québec City, QC, May, 2004

“Can the Agricola Speak? Elite Representations of the Roman Farmer” at the CAC,Fredericton, NB, May, 2003

“The Host’s Dilemma: Game Theory and Homeric Hospitality” at the CAC, Vancouver, BC, May, 2002

“Ovid’s Art: The Presence of Pornography in His Love Poetry” at the Atlantic Classical Association (ACA), Sackville, NB, October, 1998

“The Constancy of His Insincerity: Ovid’s Amores 3.14” at the ACA, Halifax, NS, October, 1997

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Dr. Miles Turnbull

Full Professor – Vice-Principal Academic

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Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2227

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