Field: Sociology

Field: Sociology

Research Expertise:
colonialism and control, criminology, Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women, prison, prison education, punishment, state violence, violence against women

Expert: Dr. Vicki Chartrand
Department: Sociology
Interview languages: English, French

Photo of Dr. Vicki Chartrand

Dr. Vicki Chartrand

Associate Professor

B.S.Sc. & M.A. (University of Ottawa), PhD. (Macquarie University, Sydney) Pm8wzowinnoak Bishop’s kchi adalagakidimek aoak kzalziwi w8banakii aln8baïkik. Bishop’s University is located on the Traditional and Unceded Territory of the Abenaki People. Dr. Vicki Chartrand is a Mama and Associate Professor in the Sociology Department at Bishop’s University, Québec and Adjunct Professor at the University of Ottawa, Criminology Department. Her current research is concerned with three interrelated areas: 1) the historical links between the criminal justice system and settler colonialism and how colonialism is deployed throughout the justice system today; 2) Indigenous grassroots work to address violence against Indigenous women; 3) alternative understandings and practices of justice and accountability embedded in anti-violence and anti-colonial frameworks.…Contact Information
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2409

B.S.Sc. & M.A. (University of Ottawa), PhD. (Macquarie University, Sydney)

Pm8wzowinnoak Bishop’s kchi adalagakidimek aoak kzalziwi w8banakii aln8baïkik.
Bishop’s University is located on the Traditional and Unceded Territory of the Abenaki People.

Dr. Vicki Chartrand is a Mama and Associate Professor in the Sociology Department at Bishop’s University, Québec and Adjunct Professor at the University of Ottawa, Criminology Department. Her current research is concerned with three interrelated areas: 1) the historical links between the criminal justice system and settler colonialism and how colonialism is deployed throughout the justice system today; 2) Indigenous grassroots work to address violence against Indigenous women; 3) alternative understandings and practices of justice and accountability embedded in anti-violence and anti-colonial frameworks. Through a Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC) emerging scholars grant, Dr. Chartrand is documenting the initiatives of Indigenous families and communities of the disappeared and murdered Indigenous women. Other research includes prison and COVID-19, women and prison release, institutional violence, pedagogy and abolition, and prison education. In addition to her research she is the recipient of the 2017/2018 Divisional Teaching Award. She is also the founder and Director of the Centre for Justice Exchange – a research centre for community justices and accountability – https://justiceexchange.ca. She is the Prisoner Struggles Editor for the Journal of Prisoners on Prison and sits on the Editorial Boards of the Annual Review of Interdisciplinary Justice Research, Canadian Journal of Criminal Justice, Decolonization of Criminology and Justice, and the Journal of Prisoners on Prison. Dr. Chartrand also has over 15 years of experience working in the non-profit, government, and voluntary sectors that includes advocating for and with women and children, Indigenous communities, and prisoners.

Publications

Journal Issues

Chartrand, V. (Ed.) (2018) Prisoners’ Struggles: Community Justice, Journal of Prisoners on Prison, 28(2).

Lehalle, S., Chartrand, V. and Kilty, J. M. (Eds.) (2016). Special Issue: Prison Education. Journal of Prisoners on Prison, 25(2). http://www.jpp.org/documents/back%20issues/JPP%2025-2.pdf

Journal Articles

Lampron, E. and Chartrand, V. (2020). Fallen Feathers: Highlighting the Canadian Government’s Responsibility in the Deaths of Seven Indigenous Youths in Thunder Bay. Canadian Journal of Law and Justice, 2(1), 227-255. Second Author.

Chartrand, V. and Lampron, E. (2019). The Art of Justice, Bishop’s University. Journal of Prisoners on Prison, 28(2), 171-174. Co-Author

Chartrand, V. (2019). Unsettled Times: Indigenous Incarceration and the Links Between Colonialism and the Penitentiary in Canada. Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Advance Online. https://www.utpjournals.press/doi/abs/10.3138/cjccj.2018-0029

 Chartrand, V. and Piché, J. (2019). Abolition and Pedagogy: Reflections on Teaching a Course on Alternatives to Penality, State Repression and Social Control. Contemporary Justice Review, 22 (1), 23-42. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10282580.2019.1576129

 Chartrand, V. (2016). I’m Not Your Carceral Other. Journal of Prisoners on Prison, 25(1), 61-62. http://www.jpp.org/documents/back%20issues/JPP%2025-1.pdf

 Chartrand, V. (2015). Landscapes of Violence: Women and Canadian Prisons. Champ pénal/Penal field, VII, 2-20. http://champpenal.revues.org/9158

Chartrand, V. (2014). Penal and Colonial Politics Over Life: Women and Penal Release Schemes in NSW, Australia. Settler Colonial Studies, 4(3), 305-320. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/2201473X.2013.864548

Chartrand, V. (2014). Tears4Justice and the Missing and Murdered Women and Children Across Canada: An Interview with Gladys Radek. Radical Criminology, 3, 113-126. http://journal.radicalcriminology.org/index.php/rc/article/view/25/html

Armstrong, K. and Chartrand, V. (2008). Checking Out But Never Leaving: Women, Prison and Community in Colonial Australia. Journal of Prisoners on Prison, 16(2), 84-96. http://www.jpp.org/documents/back%20issues/16-2_toc.pdf

Armstrong, K., Baldry, E. and Chartrand, V (2007). Human Rights Abuses and Discrimination Against Women in the Criminal Justice System in New South Wales. Australian Journal of Human Rights, 12(2), 203-227
http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/journals/AUJlHRights/2007/28.pdf

Book Chapters

Chartrand, V. and Kilty, J. M. (2017). Corston Principles in Canada: Creating the Carceral Other and Moving Beyond Women in Prison. In L. Moore, P. Scraton and A Wahidin (Eds.), Women’s Imprisonment and the Case for Abolition: Critical Reflections on Corston Ten Years On (pp. 109-128) UK: Routledge. http://tees.openrepository.com/tees/handle/10149/620758

Chartrand, V. (2017). Penal Tourism of the Carceral Other as Colonial Narrative. In J. Z. Wilson, S. Hodgkinson, J. Piché and K. Walby (Eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Prison Tourism (pp. 673-687). London: Palgrave Macmillan UK. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-56135-0_32

Chartrand, V., Abraham, M., Gazan, L., James, C., Osborne, B. and Richard, C. (2016). Visualizing Grassroots Justice: Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women. In D. M. Lavell-Harvard and J. Brant (Eds.), Forever Loved: Exposing the Hidden Crisis of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in Canada (pp. 255-266). Bradford: Demeter Press. First Author http://demeterpress.org/books/forever-loved-exposing-the-hidden-crisis-of-missing-and-murdered-indigenous-women-and-girls-in-canada/

Chartrand, V. (2016). Normalized Violence: Women and Canadian Penality. In D. Soeiro (Ed.), Exploring Issues of Confinement: Identity and Control (pp. 23-29). Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary Press. First Author
http://www.interdisciplinarypress.net/product/exploring-issues-of-confinement-identity-and-control/

Crocker, D. and Chartrand, V. (2015). Prisoner Subjectivity and Resistance Through Restorative Justice. In R. Ricciardelli and K. Maier (Eds.), Imprisonment: Experience, Identity and Practice (pp. 53-79). Oxford: InterDisciplinary Press. Second Author

Chartrand, V. (2014). Inalienable, Universal and the Right to Punish: Women, Prison and Practices of Freedom. In J. M. Kilty (Ed.), Within the Confines: Women and the Law in Canada (pp. 26-58). Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press. https://womenspress.canadianscholars.ca/books/within-the-confines

Reports

Chartrand, V. and Lampron, E. (2019). The Centre for Justice Exchange, Bishop’s University. Canadian Criminal Justice Association Justice Actualités-Report, 33(5), 19-20. Co-Author http://www.g251.ca/JusticeReport/slider.php

Chartrand, V. and Petey (2016). Structural Violence in Canada’s Prisons for Women. Canadian Criminal Justice Association Justice Actualités-Report, 31(1), 21-23. Co-Author https://www.ccja-acjp.ca/pub/en/justice-report/issue-31-1/#a6

Chartrand, V. (2015). Normalized Violence: Women and Canadian Penality. In D. Soeiro (Ed), Experiencing Prison 5. UK: InterDisciplinary Press.

Chartrand, V. (2012). Business as Usual. Canadian Criminal Justice Association Justice Actualités-Report, 27(4), 11. https://www.ccja-acjp.ca/pub/en/justice-report/

Armstrong, K., Baldry, E. and Chartrand, V. (2005). Submission to the NSW Anti-Discrimination Commissioner for an Inquiry into the Discrimination Experienced by Women Within the Criminal Justice System in New South Wales. Sydney: Beyond Bars Alliance Group. Co-Author http://www.sistersinside.com.au/media/NSWADCreport.pdf

News Articles

Chartrand, V. (2019). MMIWG: The spirit of grassroots justice lives at the heart of the struggle, The Conversation, 12 June

Chartrand, V. (2018). Broken System: Why is a quarter of Canada’s prison population Indigenous? The Conversation, 18 February. https://theconversation.com/broken-system-why-is-a-quarter-of-canadas-prison-population-indigenous-91562

Chartrand, V. (2016). Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women in Canada and Grassroots Strategies for Change. The Sherbrooke Record, 5 December. https://www.pressreader.com/canada/sherbrooke-record/20161205/281500750872025

Chartrand, V. (2009). A Stark and Humbling Business. Quesnel Cariboo Observer, 96(88): A8, 10 July

Media Work

Newsprint Interview. (2020) Palak, Mangat. Feds’ policing reforms should respect self-governance of Indigenous people, say experts, Parliamentarians, in wake of deadly, violent run-ins with police, Hills Times, 2 July. https://www.hilltimes.com/2020/07/02/feds-policing-reforms-should-respect-self-governance-of-indigenous-people-say-experts-parliamentarians-in-wake-of-deadly-violent-run-ins-with-police/255114

Newsprint Interview. (2020) Appia, Veronica. What is prison abolition and what does it do for racial justice? Canadian experts weigh in on movement, toronto.com, 21 August. https://www.toronto.com/news-story/10142284-what-is-prison-abolition-and-what-does-it-do-for-racial-justice-/

Newsprint Interview. (2020) Forester, B. Elder blasts ‘extremely racist’ parole board elder assistance program put on hold, APTN, 27 May. https://www.aptnnews.ca/national-news/elder-blasts-extremely-racist-parole-board-after-assistance-program-put-on-hold/

Newsprint Interview. (2020) Forester, B. Ottawa facing mounting pressure to protect inmates in minister’s absence, APTN, 15 May. https://www.aptnnews.ca/national-news/ottawa-facing-mounting-pressure-to-protect-inmates-in-ministers-absence/

Newsprint Interview. (2019) Gerster, J. Harper was tough on crime, Trudeau promised a new approach – did he deliver? Global News, 6 October. https://globalnews.ca/news/5887695/criminal-justice-policy/

Newsprint Interview. (2019) Gerster, J. Jeffrey Epstein could leave jail 12 hours a day. Here’s what happens in Canada. Global News, 20 July. https://globalnews.ca/news/5501168/jail-absences-canada/

Newsprint Interview. (2019). Hasham, A., Gallant, J. Gillis, W., Rankin, J. and Powell, B. The report on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls calls for sweeping justice reform. Here’s what that would require, The Star, 5 June. https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2019/06/05/the-report-on-missing-and-murdered-indigenous-women-and-girls-calls-for-sweeping-justice-reform-heres-what-that-would-require.html

Newsprint Interview. (2019). Trojan, M. MMIWG is a pandemic in North America and beyond: advocate, APTN, 6 June. https://aptnnews.ca/2019/06/06/mmiwg-is-a-pandemic-in-north-america-and-beyond-advocate/

Newsprint Interview. Gibbins, E. (2019). How these activists are fighting for the rights of missing and murdered indigenous women across North America. Hello Giggles, 24 April
https://hellogiggles.com/lifestyle/activists-fighting-for-missing-murdered-indigenous-women/

Newsprint Interview. Keith, E. (2019). Community in Corrections: Fostering a sense of belonging can lower likelihood to reoffend. Christian Courier, 11 February http://www.christiancourier.ca/news/entry/community-in-corrections

Newsprint Interview. Connolly, A.  (2019). ‘I don’t understand’: Indigenous advocates question why non-Indigenous offenders in healing lodges. Global News, 9 January https://globalnews.ca/news/4831191/healing-lodge-non-indigenous-offenders/

Televised Interview. Connolly, A. (2019). EXCLUSIVE: White and non-Indigenous offenders made up 11% of those in healing lodges last year, Global News, 8 January https://globalnews.ca/news/4825631/demographic-breakdown-healing-lodges-canada/

Newsprint Interview. Ferreras, J. (2018). Healing lodges – it’s not whether they work, but how well, research shows. Global News, 29 September https://globalnews.ca/news/4491099/healing-lodges-terri-lynne-mcclintic/

Newsprint Interview. Moro, T. (2018). ‘Shock and disappointment’ in Six Nations over Khill not guilty verdict. The Hamilton Spectator, 27 June. https://www.thespec.com/news-story/8700320–shock-and-disappointment-in-six-nations-over-khill-not-guilty-verdict/

Newsprint Interview. Rivard-Boudreau, É. (2018). L’importance des méthodes traditionnelles de guérison en prison. Radio Canada, 9 April. https://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1094136/detenus-autochtones-methodes-traditionnelles-guerison-prison-detention-aines-commission-viens

Live Radio. (2016). PRS Interview with Vicki Chartrand about Prison Letters Project. The Prison Radio Show, CKUT Montreal / McGill Campus Community Radio, 27 May.

Radio Interview. McKenna, K. (2015). Sherbrooke, Quebec, double national average for pot possession charges. CBC News Radio, 30 September. http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/sherbrooke-double-national-average-marijuana-1.3249697

Profiled. Millar, E. and Kelly, A. (2014). Canadian University Report: University profiles to help you choose – Bishop’s University, Hotshot Prof, Globe & Mail, 21 October. http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/education/university-profiles-to-help-you-choose/article21187051/?page=all

Newsprint Interview. McCully, M. (2014). Bishop’s Set to Commit Sociology. Sherbrooke Record, 3 October.

Radio Interview. (2012). Indigenous Women in Prison. McGill Community Radio Station, 26 August.

Televised Interview. (2012). Quebec vigil honours memories of 3 women murdered in Winnipeg. Aboriginal Program Television Network, 28 June. http://aptn.ca/news/2012/06/28/quebec-vigil-honours-memories-of-3-women-murdered-in-winnipeg/

Newsprint Interview. Obbard, K. (2011). Defence Against Rape. The Fulcrum, 72(11): 8, 29 February. http://thefulcrum.ca/arts/defence-against-rape/

Video Interview. (2010). Quesnel’s Affordable Housing. Video Production, Quesnel: Cinemabear Productions.

Expert Witness

Witness. (2018) Public Inquiry Commission on relation between Indigenous Peoples and certain public services in Quebec: listening reconciliation and progress, Val d’Or QC, 9 April https://bit.ly/2x2CHgm

Witness. (2017) Standing Committee on the Status of Women for the study on Indigenous Women in the Federal Justice and Correctional Systems, Ottawa ON, 7 December http://www.ourcommons.ca/content/Committee/421/FEWO/Reports/RP9991306/421_FEWO_Rpt13_PDF/421_FEWO_Rpt13-e.pdf

Custom Metadata Fields


Research Expertise:
social inequality, income inequality, public policy, government spending, political attitudes and behaviours

Expert: Dr. Josh Curtis
Department: Sociology
Interview languages: English

No results.


Research Expertise:
historical and contemporary oppression of First Nations and Aboriginals, homelessness, inequality in Canada

Expert: Dr. Mary Ellen Donnan
Department: Sociology
Interview languages: English

Photo of Dr. Mary Ellen Donnan

Dr. Mary Ellen Donnan

Full Professor – Department Chairperson

B.A. (Saskatchewan), M.A., PhD.(Carleton) I take a multi-disciplinary approach towards reveal social inequalities and contribute constructively towards diminishing them. The focus of my research and teaching is social inequality in a context of Canada’s rich and deep diversity.  A compelling understanding of social inequality comes from looking at the deep roots of homelessness in Canada. This inquiry began from a contemporary political economy framework addressing identity and exclusion from the benefits of living on Canada’s wealthy, verdant lands in the predominantly neo-liberal context of the last three decades. To do justice to the issues, the scope of my work includes struggles rooted in: Indigeneity, femininity and anti-racism as well as anti-poverty efforts.…Contact Information
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2410

B.A. (Saskatchewan), M.A., PhD.(Carleton)

I take a multi-disciplinary approach towards reveal social inequalities and contribute constructively towards diminishing them.

The focus of my research and teaching is social inequality in a context of Canada’s rich and deep diversity.  A compelling understanding of social inequality comes from looking at the deep roots of homelessness in Canada. This inquiry began from a contemporary political economy framework addressing identity and exclusion from the benefits of living on Canada’s wealthy, verdant lands in the predominantly neo-liberal context of the last three decades. To do justice to the issues, the scope of my work includes struggles rooted in: Indigeneity, femininity and anti-racism as well as anti-poverty efforts.

I have taught a very wide range of courses. Currently my subjects consider inequality, the Sociology of Indigenous / Settler relations, post- colonial theory and masculinity.

Research

I am currently writing and researching in two areas. I am following up on my homelessness book from a couple of years ago with analysis of services in Sherbrooke in support of people who are homeless. The second area of research involves community capacity building in Indigenous communities, with particular attention to First Nations of Quebec.  This work began with a shared project that followed up on the Truth and Reconciliation Commissions’ recommendations about education and the Universities Canada 13 Principles on Indigenous Education. In response to these calls for change and to our own institution, Jean Manore (BU History), Avril  Aitken (BU Education) and Mary Ellen have been studying Bishop’s Universities preparedness for better serving Indigenous students and exploring strategies for decolonizing  the University. Other work about the community capacity building strategies and successes of Quebec Indigenous people is in the early stages of creating networks and making inquiries.

Publications

Book:

Donnan, M.E. 2016. The Shattered Mosaic: How Canadian Social Structures Cause Homelessness.  Vernon, B.C. J. Charlton Publishers.

Papers and Chapters:

Donnan, M.E.,  Aitken, A., Manor, J. (accepted) “If not here, where? Making decolonization a priority at an undergraduate university” chapter accepted, “Decolonizing the Academy”, S. Cote-Meek and T. Moeke-Pickering, editors. Canadian Scholars Press

Donnan, M.E. 2016. “Domicide and Indigenous Homelessness in Canada” 2016. Journal of Sociology and Social Work Volume 4 no. 2:38-52. DOI: 10.15640/jssw.v4n2a5  available online: http://jsswnet.com/vol-4-no-2-december-2016-abstract-5-jssw

Donnan, M.E. 2016.“Using Polyversal Feminist Theory to Analyse Homelessness in Toronto” Canadian International Journal of Social Sciences and Education. January Volume 5 pages 430-441.

Donnan, M.E. 2014. “Life after Neoliberalism in Canada: How Policy Creates Homelessness and How Citizenship Models Fail to Provide Solutions” International Journal of Arts and Sciences 2014.

Donnan, M.E. 2008. “Making Change: Gender, Careers and Citizenship” pages 134-171 in, Gender Relations in Canada: Intersectionality and Beyond by Janet Siltanen and Andrea Doucette. Oxford University Press, 2008.

Donnan, M.E. 2005. “Affordable Housing and Social Sustainability in Canadian Cities” International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability. Volume 1, 2005 http://www.sustainability-journal.com.

Donnan, M.E. 2003. “Slow Advances: The Academy’s Response to Sexual Assault” in The Madwoman in the Academy: Forty Women Boldly Take on the Ivory Tower. Deborah Keahey and Deborah Schnitzer (Editors), Calgary: University of Calgary Press, 2003. This book won the Alberta Scholarly Book of the Year Award.

Conference Papers Presented:

Aitken, M.E. Donnan, Manore, J. 2018 “Decolonization and the Academy” Quebec Past and Present: Annual Colloquium on Quebec Studies Bishop’s University.

Aitken, M.E. Donnan, J. Manore. 2017. “Higher Education, the 13 Principles and Indigenous Peoples: Putting words into action at Bishop’s” The Struggle for Social and Environmental Rights: Brazil and Canada in Solidarity”. International Conference, Bishop’s University. Sherbrooke QC.

Donnan, M.E. 2017. “Moving Towards AntiColonial Positions in Partnership” presented at: Indigenous Peoples- University Relations: Are Partnerships a Path to Reconciliation? Colloquium at Bishop’s University.

Donnan, M.E. 2017. “Domicide and Indigenous Homelessness in Canada” National Conference on Ending Homelessness. London Ontario.

Donnan, M.E. 2016. “How Political Neglect and Racialization Deepen Social Inequality in Toronto” Social Inequality and Policy Implications session, Canadian Sociological Association Meetings, Calgary, Alberta.

Donnan, M.E. 2015. “Polyversal feminism can deconstruct homelessness in Toronto” Keynote address at International Conference on Arts, Social Sciences, Economics and Education.

Donnan, M.E. 2014. “Life After Neoliberalism in Canada: How Policy Creates Homelessness and Citizenship-Models Limit Solutions.” International Journal of Arts and Sciences Conference. Paris.

Donnan, M.E. 2014. “Inadequate Housing of Aboriginal People in Winnipeg with Low-Incomes” Canadian Sociology Association Meetings. St. Catherine’s Ontario.

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