Field: Feminist and Gender Studies

Field: Feminist and Gender Studies

Research Expertise:
colonialism and control, criminology, Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women, prison, prison education, punishment, state violence, violence against women

Expert: Dr. Vicki Chartrand
Department: Sociology
Interview languages: English, French

Photo of Dr. Vicki Chartrand

Dr. Vicki Chartrand

Associate Professor

B.S.Sc. & M.A. (University of Ottawa), PhD. (Macquarie University, Sydney)Dr. Chartrand is Associate Professor in the Sociology Department at Bishop’s University, Québec. She is also Adjunct Professor in the Department of Criminology at the University of Ottawa. Her general research background and interests include penal and carceral politics, modern day colonialism, grassroots justices, and collaborative methodologies. Dr. Chartrand recently received a Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC) emerging scholars grant to collect and document the initiatives and strategies of Indigenous families and communities to address missing and murdered Indigenous women and explore alternative grassroots justices. Her other current research project traces the historical links between penal and colonial logics to understand the incarceration of Indigenous peoples in Canada today.…Contact Information
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2409

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B.S.Sc. & M.A. (University of Ottawa), PhD. (Macquarie University, Sydney)

Dr. Chartrand is Associate Professor in the Sociology Department at Bishop’s University, Québec. She is also Adjunct Professor in the Department of Criminology at the University of Ottawa. Her general research background and interests include penal and carceral politics, modern day colonialism, grassroots justices, and collaborative methodologies. Dr. Chartrand recently received a Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC) emerging scholars grant to collect and document the initiatives and strategies of Indigenous families and communities to address missing and murdered Indigenous women and explore alternative grassroots justices. Her other current research project traces the historical links between penal and colonial logics to understand the incarceration of Indigenous peoples in Canada today. Other research has included pedagogy and abolition, women and prison release, institutional violence, and prison education. Dr. Chartrand has over 15 years of experience working in the non-profit, government, and voluntary sectors. This includes advocating for and with women and children, Indigenous communities, and prisoners. She is the founding member of the Centre of Justice Exchange; a collective of academics, students, and individuals who seek to advance more inclusive justices. Dr. Chartrand is the Prisoner Struggles Editor for the Journal of Prisoners on Prison and sits on the Editorial Boards of the Annual Review of Interdisciplinary Justice Research, Canadian Journal of Criminal Justice, Decolonization of Criminology and Justice, and the Journal of Prisoners on Prison.

Publications

Journal Issues

Lehalle, S., Chartrand, V. & Kilty, J. M. (Eds.) (2016). Special Issue: Prison Education. Journal of Prisoners on Prison, 25(2). (Co-Author) http://www.jpp.org/documents/back%20issues/JPP%2025-2.pdf

Book Chapters (refereed)

Chartrand, V. & Kilty, J. M. (2017). Corston Principles in Canada: Creating the Carceral Other and Moving Beyond Women in Prison. In L. Moore, P. Scraton & A Wahidin (Eds.), Women’s Imprisonment and the Case for Abolition: Critical Reflections on Corston Ten Years On (pp. 109-128) UK: Routledge. Co-author.  http://tees.openrepository.com/tees/handle/10149/620758

Chartrand, V. (2017). Penal Tourism of the Carceral Other as Colonial Narrative. In J. Z. Wilson, S. Hodgkinson, J. Piché & K. Walby (Eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Prison Tourism (pp. 673-687). London: Palgrave Macmillan UK. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-56135-0_32

Chartrand, V., Abraham, M., Gazan, L., James, C., Osborne, B. & Richard, C. (2016). Visualizing Grassroots Justice: Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women. In D. M. Lavell-Harvard & J. Brant (Eds.), Forever Loved: Exposing the Hidden Crisis of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in Canada (pp. 255-266). Bradford: Demeter Press. First Author. http://demeterpress.org/books/forever-loved-exposing-the-hidden-crisis-of-missing-and-murdered-indigenous-women-and-girls-in-canada/

Chartrand, V. (2016). Normalized Violence: Women and Canadian Penality. In D. Soeiro (Ed.), Exploring Issues of Confinement: Identity and Control (pp. 23-29). Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary Press. First Author. http://www.interdisciplinarypress.net/product/exploring-issues-of-confinement-identity-and-control/

Crocker, D. & Chartrand, V. (2015). Prisoner Subjectivity and Resistance Through Restorative Justice. In R. Ricciardelli & K. Maier (Eds.), Imprisonment: Experience, Identity and Practice (pp. 53-79). Oxford: InterDisciplinary Press. Second Author.

Chartrand, V. (2014). Inalienable, Universal and the Right to Punish: Women, Prison and Practices of Freedom. In J. M. Kilty (Ed.), Within the Confines: Women and the Law in Canada (pp. 26-58). Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press. https://womenspress.canadianscholars.ca/books/within-the-confines

Journal Articles (refereed)

Chartrand, V. (Under Review). In through the outdoor: A history of women and penal release in New South Wales, Australia. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology.

Chartrand, V. (R&R). Indigenous Incarceration and the Links Between Colonialism and the Penitentiary in Canada. Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice.

Chartrand, V. & Piché, J. (Under Review). Abolition and Pedagogy: Reflections on Teaching a Course on Alternatives to Penality, State Repression and Social Control. Criminal Justice Review. First author.

Chartrand, V. (2016). I’m Not Your Carceral Other. Journal of Prisoners on Prison, 25(1), 61-62. http://www.jpp.org/documents/back%20issues/JPP%2025-1.pdf

Chartrand, V. (2015). Landscapes of Violence: Women and Canadian Prisons. Champ pénal/Penal field, VII, 2-20. http://champpenal.revues.org/9158

Chartrand, V. (2014). Penal and Colonial Politics Over Life: Women and Penal Release Schemes in NSW, Australia. Settler Colonial Studies, 4(3), 305-320. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/2201473X.2013.864548

Chartrand, V. (2014). Tears4Justice and the Missing and Murdered Women and Children Across Canada: An Interview with Gladys Radek. Radical Criminology, 3, 113-126. http://journal.radicalcriminology.org/index.php/rc/article/view/25/html

Armstrong, K. & Chartrand, V. (2008). Checking Out But Never Leaving: Women, Prison and Community in Colonial Australia. Journal of Prisoners on Prison, 16(2), 84-96. Co-author. http://www.jpp.org/documents/back%20issues/16-2_toc.pdf

Armstrong, K., Baldry, E. & Chartrand, V (2007). Human Rights Abuses and Discrimination Against Women in the Criminal Justice System in New South Wales. Australian Journal of Human Rights, 12(2), 203-227. Co-author
http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/journals/AUJlHRights/2007/28.pdf

Reports and Invited Contributions

Chartrand, V. & Petey (2016). Structural Violence in Canada’s Prisons for Women. Canadian Criminal Justice Association Justice Actualités-Report, 31(1), 21-23. First Author. https://www.ccja-acjp.ca/pub/en/justice-report/issue-31-1/#a6

Chartrand, V. (2012). Business as Usual. Canadian Criminal Justice Association Justice Actualités-Report, 27(4), 11. https://www.ccja-acjp.ca/pub/en/justice-report/

Armstrong, K., Baldry, E. & Chartrand, V. (2005). Submission to the NSW Anti-Discrimination Commissioner for an Inquiry into the Discrimination Experienced by Women Within the Criminal Justice System in New South Wales. Sydney: Beyond Bars Alliance Group. Co-author. http://www.sistersinside.com.au/media/NSWADCreport.pdf

News Articles

Chartrand, V. (2018). Broken System: Why is a quarter of Canada’s prison population Indigenous?. The Conversation, 18 February. https://theconversation.com/broken-system-why-is-a-quarter-of-canadas-prison-population-indigenous-91562

Chartrand, V. (2016). Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women in Canada and Grassroots Strategies for Change. The Sherbrooke Record, 5 December. https://www.pressreader.com/canada/sherbrooke-record/20161205/281500750872025

Conference Proceedings (published)

Chartrand, V. (2015). Normalized Violence: Women and Canadian Penality. In D. Soeiro (Ed), Experiencing Prison 5. UK: InterDisciplinary Press.

Media Work

Interview. Moro, T. (2018). ‘Shock and disappointment’ in Six Nations over Khill not guilty verdict. The Hamilton Spectator, 27 June.

https://www.thespec.com/news-story/8700320–shock-and-disappointment-in-six-nations-over-khill-not-guilty-verdict/

Interview. Rivard-Boudreau, É. (2018). L’importance des méthodes traditionnelles de guérison en prison. Radio Canada, 9 April. https://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1094136/detenus-autochtones-methodes-traditionnelles-guerison-prison-detention-aines-commission-viens

Interview. (2016). PRS Interview with Vicki Chartrand about Prison Letters Project. The Prison Radio Show, CKUT Montreal / McGill Campus Community Radio, 27 May.

Interview. McKenna, K. (2015). Sherbrooke, Quebec, double national average for pot possession charges. CBC News Radio, 30 September.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/sherbrooke-double-national-average-marijuana-1.3249697

Interview. Millar, E. & Kelly, A. (2014). Canadian University Report: University profiles to help you choose – Bishop’s University, Hotshot Prof, Globe & Mail, 21 October.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/education/university-profiles-to-help-you-choose/article21187051/?page=all

Interview. McCully, M. (2014). Bishop’s Set to Commit Sociology. Sherbrooke Record, 3 October.

Interview. (2012). Indigenous Women in Prison. McGill Community Radio Station, 26 August.

Interview. (2012). Quebec vigil honours memories of 3 women murdered in Winnipeg. Aboriginal Program Television Network, 28 June.

http://aptn.ca/news/2012/06/28/quebec-vigil-honours-memories-of-3-women-murdered-in-winnipeg/

Interview. Obbard, K. (2011). Defence Against Rape. The Fulcrum, 72(11): 8, 29 February. http://thefulcrum.ca/arts/defence-against-rape/

Interview. (2010). Quesnel’s Affordable Housing. Video Production, Quesnel: Cinemabear Productions.

Chartrand, V. (2009). A Stark and Humbling Business. Quesnel Cariboo Observer, 96(88): A8, 10 July

Knowledge Transfer

Witness. Public Inquiry Commission on relation between Indigenous Peoples and certain public services in Quebec: listening reconciliation and progress, Val d’Or QC, 9 April

Witness. Standing Committee on the Status of Women for the study on Indigenous Women in the Federal Justice and Correctional Systems, Ottawa ON, 7 December

Guest Presenter. Stolen Sisters and Indigenous Grassroots Strategies for Change, Senior Academy for Life-long Learning (SALL), Uplands Cultural and Heritage Centre, Sherbrooke QC, 9 November

Speaker. Film Screening: Highway of Tears, Bishop’s University, Sherbrooke QC 19 October

Undergraduate Student Publication. Jackson, S. (2016). Rape Culture on University Campuses in Canada: The Power of Privilege. Justice Report, 32(2). /
https://www.ccja-acjp.ca/pub/en/justice-report/issue-32-2/#a5.

Undergraduate Student Publication. Pohl, E. (2016). Offenders Deemed Not Criminally Responsible: Fugitives from Justice?. Justice Report, 32(2). https://www.ccja-acjp.ca/pub/en/justice-report/issue-32-2/#a5.

Select Conference Presentations

Chartrand, V. (2017). Sisters in Spirit: Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women in Canada and Grassroots Strategies for Change. International Conference on Penal Abolition, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, 26-29 July.

Chartrand, V. (2017). Unsettling Colonial Logics: Indigenous Incarceration and the Links between Settler Colonialism and the Penitentiary in Canada. Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Conference 2017, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 22-24 June.

Chartrand, V. (2017). Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women in Canada and Grassroots Justice Strategies / Centre of Justice Exchange Art Installation: Representations of Justice. Critical Criminology / Representing Justice: A Joint National Conference of Critical Perspectives: Criminology and Social Justice (Carleton University / University of Ottawa) and the Centre for Interdisciplinary Justice Research (University of Winnipeg), University of Ottawa, Ottawa, 4-5 May.

Chartrand, V. (2016). Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women in Canada and Grassroots Strategies for Change. National Women’s Studies Association 37th Annual Conference, Montreal, 10-13 November.

Chartrand, V. (2016). Unsettled Times: Tracing Colonial and Penal Logics in Canada. Placing Justice: Critical Perspectives on Space, Justice, Law and Order, University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg MB, 9-11 May.

Chartrand, V. (2016). Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women in Canada. National Association for Ethnic Studies 44th Annual Conference, Resistance: Borders and Power, Social Justice and Community, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 17-19 March.


Research Expertise:
hijab, human rights in Morocco, Islam, niqab, reasonable accommodations, secularism, veil, women’s rights in Morocco

Expert: Dr. Osire Glacier
Department: History, Religion, Politics and International Studies
Interview languages: English, French

Photo of Dr. Osire Glacier

Dr. Osire Glacier

Contract Faculty

Osire Glacier (Ph.D. McGill University, Montréal, 2010) teaches in the History Department, the Religion Department and the Department of Politics and International Studies. She teaches courses in Islam, Women in Islam and Politics and Religion in the Middle East and North Africa. Her research focuses on Moroccan women’s history, politics of gender and sexuality in postcolonial Morocco, and politics of human rights in postcolonial Morocco. She is the author of Sociopolitical Discourse of Femininity, Masculinity and Sexuality in Morocco (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017), Les droits humains au Maroc : entre discours et réalité (Tarik Éditions, 2015), Universal Rights, Systemic Violations and Cultural Relativism in Morocco (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013), and Political Women in Morocco: Then and Now (Africa World Press, 2013), which was published in French as Femmes politiques au Maroc: d’hier à aujourd’hui (Tarik Éditions, 2013).…Contact Information

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Osire Glacier (Ph.D. McGill University, Montréal, 2010) teaches in the History Department, the Religion Department and the Department of Politics and International Studies. She teaches courses in Islam, Women in Islam and Politics and Religion in the Middle East and North Africa. Her research focuses on Moroccan women’s history, politics of gender and sexuality in postcolonial Morocco, and politics of human rights in postcolonial Morocco. She is the author of Sociopolitical Discourse of Femininity, Masculinity and Sexuality in Morocco (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017), Les droits humains au Maroc : entre discours et réalité (Tarik Éditions, 2015), Universal Rights, Systemic Violations and Cultural Relativism in Morocco (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013), and Political Women in Morocco: Then and Now (Africa World Press, 2013), which was published in French as Femmes politiques au Maroc: d’hier à aujourd’hui (Tarik Éditions, 2013).

Her blog, http://www.etudesmarocaines.com, aims at disseminating academic knowledge about North African issues within the general public.


Research Expertise:
archives, Canadian women authors, female authorship, feminist theory

Expert: Dr. Linda Morra
Department: English
Interview languages: English, French

Photo of Dr. Linda Morra

Dr. Linda Morra

Full Professor

Dr. Linda Morra is a Full Professor of English at Bishop’s University. She served as the Craig Dobbin Chair of Canadian Studies at University College Dublin for the 2016-2017 year. During her term in Dublin, she conceived of and staged ‘Untold Stories of the Past 150 Years’ (April 2017), from which she is co-editing a volume of papers. In January 2016, with a Sproul Fellowship from the Institute of Canadian Studies, she served as a Visiting Scholar at the University of California, Berkeley. She currently holds three SSHRC grants, one of these a Connection Grant for the 'Untold Stories' conference and another an Insight Grant to support her research for Jane Rule's biography.…Contact Information
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2872

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Dr. Linda Morra is a Full Professor of English at Bishop’s University. She served as the Craig Dobbin Chair of Canadian Studies at University College Dublin for the 2016-2017 year. During her term in Dublin, she conceived of and staged ‘Untold Stories of the Past 150 Years’ (April 2017), from which she is co-editing a volume of papers. In January 2016, with a Sproul Fellowship from the Institute of Canadian Studies, she served as a Visiting Scholar at the University of California, Berkeley. She currently holds three SSHRC grants, one of these a Connection Grant for the ‘Untold Stories’ conference and another an Insight Grant to support her research for Jane Rule’s biography.

Her most recent book, Unarrested Archives: Case Studies in Twentieth-Century Women’s Authorship (University of Toronto Press in December 2014), was a finalist for the Gabrielle Roy Prize in English in 2015. Awarded a SSHRC Standard Research Grant (2005-2009) and the FQRSC Etablissement de nouveaux professeurs-chercheurs (2009-2013) for research that undergirds this book, she examines how Canadian women writers approached their own archives for the purposes of locating self-agency. She then investigates how they were regulated and contained, and how they existed in or resisted both personal and professional antagonist relationships. These antagonisms generated the very divisions, the conflictual set of relations, by which women then engaged in productive disruptions.

During her research for the latter book, she discovered Jane Rule’s hand-written autobiography, Taking My Life, in the University of British Columbia archives. She subsequently transcribed, edited, and prepared the autobiography for publication (Talon 2011) and also wrote the afterword. Taking My Life was shortlisted for the LAMBDA Award (2012), received a nomination for the Stonewall Book Award (2011), and garnered many positive reviews. One such review appeared in The Globe and Mail. She is drawing upon this research to write the biography of Jane Rule, her current research in progress.

As she worked on her monograph, she also collaborated with Dr. Jessica Schagerl on editing Basements and Attics, Closets and Cyberspace: Explorations in Canadian Women’s Archives (WLUP 2012), a collection of essays that assesses the negotiations—and sometimes contradictions—involved in responsibly dealing with the tangible records of women’s public and private lives, and the fact that these preserved archival documents were often not seen as part of a systematic nation-building process.

This collaboration was preceded by another with Dr. Deanna Reder. Together, they co-edited the interdisciplinary collection, Troubling Tricksters (WLUP 2010). Dr. Reder and she collaborated on another book, which comes out of support by a SSHRC Connections Grant (January 2014) and which drew together Indigenous studies scholars and students from across the country to consider pedagogical approaches to Indigenous literatures. The event took place at the end of February 2014 in Vancouver, at which time she and Dr. Reder workshopped their new anthology, Learn, Teach, Challenge: Approaching Indigenous Literatures (Wilfrid Laurier University Press 2016).

She is also at work with Dr. Laura Davis (Red Deer) on a book, forthcoming with the University of Alberta Press and which is titled, Margaret Laurence and Jack McClelland: Letters (forthcoming 2018). The project was supported by a SSHRC Insight Development Grant to 2016. She has received a contract for a volume of papers she edited, titled Moving Archives (WLUP), submitted in 2017.

Dr. Morra has won several teaching awards, including the Departmental teaching Award (2008-2009) and Best Professor of the Humanities (2007-2008 and 2009-2010), and has been nominated for several others, including the William and Nancy Turner Teaching Award (2010-2011). She was also awarded the Faculty Evaluation Committee Merit Award for Research/Teaching in 2010 and then again in 2013.

She served as the President of the Quebec Writers’ Federation (2014-2016), for which she developed their Youth Prize, and sits on the advisory board for Guernica Press, Canadian Literature, and Studies in Canadian Literature. She runs the Morris House Reading Series at Bishop’s University and the Student Writing Week/End in the Eastern Townships (SWEET). Visit her website.

Research

Dr. Linda M. Morra is working on research related to Jane Rule (1931-2007). Novelist, short story writer, essayist, activist, and contributor to the queer liberation periodical, The Body Politic (1971-1987), Rule made an enormous contribution to the literary and socio-cultural production of, and enlargement of space for, the queer community during her lifetime. This research grew out of her most recent book, Unarrested Archives: Case Studies in Twentieth-Century Women’s Authorship, which recalibrates current scholarly perspectives on Canadian women writers’ agencies in the twentieth century by historicizing the emergence of the notion of unhindered female authorship and by examining how their literary archives came to be forged within, against, or outside centralized repositories of official records. She is also editing a volume of essays, forthcoming in 2016, titled Moving Archives, in which contributors assess the affective, digital, and contextual processes that affect how archives are shaped and change shape over time.