Graduate Certificate in Brewing Science

The mission of the Graduate Certificate in Brewing Science program is to provide a comprehensive education on the science of the ingredients of beer, the brewing process, and the analytical methods specific to the brewing industry. This education is fortified by more than 200 hours of brewing experience on state-of-the-art equipment.

The Graduate Certificate in Brewing Science is a program designed specifically to meet the growing need for well-trained, scientifically educated brewers and/or brewing analysts in the craft and industrial brewing sectors.

Overview of the program

The program uses the craft-brewing industry as its model, not only because it is one of the fastest growing industries in North America, but because this industry is representative of the international brewing community and demonstrates a deep appreciation for the rich history of beer and brewing. Our students are encouraged to experiment with recipes and brewing regimens in order to understand how access to ingredients and tradition led to characteristic regional beer styles and how globalization of brewing ingredients has led to a renaissance, some might say resurrection, of flavourful beers.

The program focuses on the brewing process itself and the science underlying it. Graduates will understand brewing at the molecular level and as a result understand why brewing quality beer requires rigorous attention to detail at every step.

Students completing the proposed certificate will be in high demand to fill assistant brewer, head brewer, brewmaster, product analysis/quality control, and R & D positions in both the craft brewing and industrial brewing sectors. They would also be well prepared to start up their own microbrewery should that be their goal.

Duration

It is a full-time, 2-semester, 24-credit graduate program that begins in the Fall. The program includes rigorous scientific material and as a result, a B.Sc. in Biology, Biochemistry, Chemistry, or a related discipline, is required for admission. See information on Financial Aid available for this program.

Course Outline

Fall

BRS501 – Brewing Water (3 credits)

BRS501 – Brewing Water (3 credits)

Water, referred to as Hot Liquor in brewing jargon, provides the medium in which all of the chemical and biochemical reactions that are involved in producing beer take place. Additionally, the mineral content of the Hot Liquor is a critical factor in determining many of the final characteristics of the beer, provides many of the essential elements for healthy yeast growth, and contributes enormously to mash pH. This course provides an in depth, comprehensive look at water, its properties, and how its mineral contents affect all aspects of beer and the brewing process.

Chemical analysis

BRS502 – Malt and Malting (3 credits)

BRS502 – Malt and Malting (3 credits)

Malt is produced by the germination of grain (barley, wheat, rye, etc.) followed by application of heat (kilning). It is the heat regimen, together with the type of grain, that determines the characteristics of the malt. The malt is the source of the starch that is converted to sugars which the yeast ferments to produce alcohol and it is also primarily responsible for the colour of the beer. Malt is also an important contributor to flavour, aroma, characteristics of the foam (head), mouth feel, and other characteristics of the beer. This course will cover malt from farming and harvesting of the grain, through the transformations of the malting process, to its chemical and biochemical transformations in the brew house.

Malt Sieves

BRS503 – Hops (3 credits)

BRS503 – Hops (3 credits)

Hops is the ingredient that contributes the characteristic bitterness of beer. It is also responsible for much of the flavours and aromas of beer, particularly those observed in heavily hopped beers such as India Pale Ale, American Pale Ale, and even hoppier double IPAs. The first section of this course will cover the farming, harvesting and processing of hops. The second section will cover hop chemistry, focusing on the resins (bittering agents) and essential oils (flavour and aroma contributors) of the hop cone and their transformations during the brewing process.

Students making beer

BRS598 – Brewing Practicum I (3 credits)

BRS598 – Brewing Practicum I (3 credits)

Ultimately, brewing is a hands-on activity. The brewer must pay careful attention at every step of the brewing process in order to ensure that they have the best chance of producing the desired final product. Even then, the beer, although well crafted, may not exhibit the characteristics of flavour, aroma, colour, bitterness, etc. that the brewer was attempting to produce. Recipe development is a wonderful example of the scientific method and this approach to brewing will be the main focus of this course. Upon completion of BRS 598 and BRS 599, students will receive more than 180 hours of brewing experience, constantly comparing what they observe in the brewery with what they are learning in their BRS lecture courses. The aim is to produce a brewer who is proficient in the brewery but also understands the complex chemistry and biochemistry that is involved in producing the highest quality beers. Students in this program must complete both BRS 598 and BRS 599 as they take the six lecture courses of the Graduate Certificate in the Brewing Science program.

Bishop's Graduate Certificate in Brewing Science

Winter

BRS504 – Microorganisms in the Brewery (3 credits)

BRS504 – Microorganisms in the Brewery (3 credits)

The role of brewer’s yeast in the brewing process, particularly its fermentation of sugars to produce alcohol, is fairly well known. However, yeast is also responsible for producing dozens, if not hundreds, of chemical compounds as it metabolizes the sugars, amino acids, and other components during fermentation. Many of these compounds contribute significantly to the flavour and aroma of beer. Other microorganisms, such as wild yeast and bacteria, are also potential contributors to the complex chemistry and biochemistry that occurs in the fermenter; sometimes to the benefit of the beer but more often to its detriment. This course will look at all of the microorganisms that are commonly found in the brewery and provide a detailed description of their chemistry and thus their impact on beer flavour and aroma.

Microorganism

BRS505 – Chemical Analysis of Beer and Ingredients (3 credits)

BRS505 – Chemical Analysis of Beer and Ingredients (3 credits)

As a food product, beer is rigorously controlled at both the federal and provincial levels of government. Part of this process is ensuring that a number of analytical parameters are accurately reported (e.g. alcohol by volume). Many other properties of beer are indicators of the efficacy of the brewing process and whether the brewer is producing a quality product. Analysis of the ingredients of beer (water, malt, hops, yeast) is essential to ensure that standards of quality necessary to produce good beer are met. This course will provide students with an in depth look at the chemical analyses commonly used to analyse beer and its precursors, using the methods database of the American Society of Brewing Chemists. Students will use what they learn to analyse the ingredients and the beer that they use / produce in the co-requisite practicum in brewing.

Chemical Analysis of Beer

BRS506 – The Business of Brewing (3 credits)

BRS506 – The Business of Brewing (3 credits)

There is a great deal of time and hard work that goes into planning, building, equipping, and running even a small microbrewery. When a microbrewery fails, it is generally because the ownership doesn’t have a particular skill set, whether it be on the brewing side or on the business side. This course will take students through all of the steps necessary to get a microbrewery from the planning to the operation stage, and also introduce them to the business knowledge necessary for running a successful microbrewery.

The Business of Brewing

BRS599 - Brewing Practicum II (3 credits)

BRS599 – Brewing Practicum II (3 credits)

Ultimately, brewing is a hands-on activity. The brewer must pay careful attention at every step of the brewing process in order to ensure that they have the best chance of producing the desired final product. Even then, the beer, although well crafted, may not exhibit the characteristics of flavour, aroma, colour, bitterness, etc. that the brewer was attempting to produce. Recipe development is a wonderful example of the scientific method and this approach to brewing will be the main focus of this course. Upon completion of BRS 598 and BRS 599, students will receive more than 180 hours of brewing experience, constantly comparing what they observe in the brewery with what they are learning in their BRS lecture courses. The aim is to produce a brewer who is proficient in the brewery but also understands the complex chemistry and biochemistry that is involved in producing the highest quality beers. Students in this program must complete both BRS 598 and BRS 599 as they take the six lecture courses of the Graduate Certificate in the Brewing Science program.

Bishop's brewery program

Spring

Internship in a commercial microbrewery (4 weeks) at the end of the program.

Apply Now to the Brewing Science program

For more information about the program, please communicate with Dr. Alexandre Drouin, at adrouin@ubishops.ca.

Bishop's Arches BreweryStudents are encouraged to develop recipes which are brewed and made available for purchase in growlers and bottles at the on-site Bishop’s Arches Brewery store.

 

Beer made by Bishop's students

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