Two Researchers Win the Bishop’s University’s Emerging Scholar Award
 

Two Researchers Win the Bishop’s University’s Emerging Scholar Award

On Thursday, March 30th, during the Research Week Closing Reception, two researchers will receive the Bishop’s University Emerging Scholar Award. This award recognizes outstanding researchers and creators whose work has made a significant impact on their disciplines or fields.

Dr. Sarah-Myriam Martin-BrûléDr. Sarah-Myriam Martin-Brûlé of the Department of Politics and International Studies is being acknowledged for her outstanding contribution to scholarship on United Nations peacekeeping missions, peacekeeping intelligence and Joint Mission Analysis Centres. As a result of fieldwork conducted in Norway as well as in various African nations, where she interviewed rebel leaders, refugees, experts, JMAC Chiefs and over 40 JMAC analysts of all ranks, Dr. Martin-Brûlé has been called upon to contribute her expertise as the main United Nations Consultant in writing the first JMAC handbook and in giving important briefings to the federal Minister of Defense as well as to the Minister of International Development and la Francophonie. Her students have also benefited from their professor’s expertise on the United Nations as they participated and excelled in the National Model of United Nations in New York as well as in the largest United Nations simulation in Canadian history, organized by Dr. Martin-Brûlé and held at Bishop’s University in 2016.

Dr. Gordon BarkerDr. Gordon Barker of the Department of History has contributed important research to American and African American history by revealing the contribution, experiences, and agency of persons of African descent and by bringing fugitive slave dramas back to the centre stage in pre-Civil War American History. His ongoing research also explores the transnationalism of American and Canadian Blacks, further exposes racism in antebellum America and Early Canada, and underscores the agency of Black women, particularly of the female fugitive slaves and the free Black Women kidnapped into slavery. Over the past seven years, Dr. Barker has published two important monographs that have attracted praise and official recognitions within and beyond his academic field. The Imperfect Revolution: Anthony Burns and the Landscape of Race in Antebellum America (2010) and Fugitive Slaves and the Unfinished American Revolution (2013) have helped to better position African American history within the grand American narrative. Dr. Barker also actively works to bring his research knowledge outside the walls of academia by participating in numerous knowledge mobilization and community outreach activities that target general audiences, often outside the field of history, including public officials, pre-university educators, artists, and serious general readers.

Congratulations Dr. Martin-Brûlé and Dr. Barker!