Faculty

Faculty

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Dr. Darren Bardati

Full Professor – Department Chairperson

Dr. Bardati earned his PhD and Master’s degrees at McGill University, and a BA Honours in Geography from Bishop’s. Since 1996, he has taught resource and environmental management courses in the Department of Environment and Geography. His research interests revolve around community-level adaptation to climate change, food security and local food systems. He and his wife founded the Lennoxville Farmers’ Market, and enjoy living on a small farm where they tend large gardens, save heirloom seeds, and raise a variety of animals.…Contact Information and full bio
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2462

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Dr. Bardati earned his PhD and Master’s degrees at McGill University, and a BA Honours in Geography from Bishop’s. Since 1996, he has taught resource and environmental management courses in the Department of Environment and Geography. His research interests revolve around community-level adaptation to climate change, food security and local food systems. He and his wife founded the Lennoxville Farmers’ Market, and enjoy living on a small farm where they tend large gardens, save heirloom seeds, and raise a variety of animals.

Dr. Bardati’s website

Photo of Dr. Tom Fletcher

Dr. Tom Fletcher

Full Professor

Environmental Policy, Environmental Justice, International Environmental Issues, Urban Planning Dr. Fletcher has a Ph.D. from McGill University, an M.A. from University of Maryland and a B.A. from Louisiana State University. He teaches a variety of environmental courses as well as human geography and urban planning. His expertise is the study of environmental justice, especially as it relates to hazardous waste, toxic substances and oil transport.…Contact Information and full bio
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2476

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Environmental Policy, Environmental Justice, International Environmental Issues, Urban Planning

Dr. Fletcher has a Ph.D. from McGill University, an M.A. from University of Maryland and a B.A. from Louisiana State University. He teaches a variety of environmental courses as well as human geography and urban planning. His expertise is the study of environmental justice, especially as it relates to hazardous waste, toxic substances and oil transport. Since he began teaching the Bishop’s course on environmental justice, he has developed a growing interest in cases of environmental injustice that are not typically framed or defined as such, but to which distributive and procedural social justice concepts, frameworks and theories are nonetheless applicable and illustrative. This is especially important in the Canadian context, where environmental problems, and the inevitable competing claims regarding fairness that drive conflict over pollution and natural resources, tend NOT to be framed or defined as environmental injustice.

Recently, Tom has also conducted research on the history of watershed groups in the Eastern Townships region of Quebec, principally by reviewing the archival fonds (as archival collections are called in Quebec due to governmental accreditation rules) of Memphremagog Conservation, Inc. and Massawippi Water Protection, Inc. Both collections are held at Bishop’s University as part of the Eastern Townships Resource Centre (ETRC) archive. Founded in the late-1960s at the beginning of the current reform environmental period and still active today, the histories of these groups are interesting local examples of how North American environmentalism has developed and changed, decade by decade.

Tom’s research has been supported by the Fulbright Foundation, SSHRC, Hydro-Québec, the Max Bell Foundation and a variety of internal research awards from Bishop’s (including our MUSCLE Cluster) and McGill universities.

Publications (since 2000)

Books

Fletcher, T. (in press, expected publication early 2016, under contract with University of Toronto Press, Higher Education Division). The Environmental Justice Movement: Interpreting Environmental Problems as Injustices. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Harper, C. and T. Fletcher. 2010. Environment and Society: Human Perspectives on Environmental Issues.  (Canadian Edition). Toronto: Pearson Canada.

Fletcher, T. 2003. From Love Canal to Environmental Justice: The Politics of Hazardous Waste on the Canada-U.S. Border. Peterborough, ON: Broadview Press (now distributed by University of Toronto Press, Higher Education Division).

Articles

Fletcher, T. (2011). Love Canal, Birkshire Encyclopedia of Sustainability: The Law and Politics of Sustainability.  Birkshire, MA: Birkshire Publishing.

2005. Encyclopedia of New York State articles on Acid Deposition, Chemical Industry, Hooker Chemical Corporation, Love Canal, Pollution and Riverkeeper. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press.

2003. The industrial-environmental history of Niagara. History Now 9(1): 12-16.

2002. Neighborhood change at Love Canal: contamination, evacuation and resettlement. Land Use Policy 19(4): 311-323.

2001. Municipal fusion in the Sherbrooke region: the case of Lennoxville. Journal of Eastern Townships Studies 19: 57-74.

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Dr. Norman Jones

Full Professor

Glacial Environments, Geomorphology, Global Environmental Change, Soils and Vegetation, Natural Hazards Dr. Jones earned his Bachelor's degree at McMaster University and his Masters degree at University of Alberta, as well as receiving his PhD from University of Waterloo. He teaches a variety of courses, including Geomorphology, Soils and Vegetation, Environmental Change, Glacial Environments, and Natural Hazards.Contact Information and full bio
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2477

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Glacial Environments, Geomorphology, Global Environmental Change, Soils and Vegetation, Natural Hazards

Dr. Jones earned his Bachelor’s degree at McMaster University and his Masters degree at University of Alberta, as well as receiving his PhD from University of Waterloo. He teaches a variety of courses, including Geomorphology, Soils and Vegetation, Environmental Change, Glacial Environments, and Natural Hazards.

Research

Dr. Jones conducts research on climate change, specifically as related to floods and flood hazards, with a primary focus on the Eastern Townships region of Quebec. His has published research papers on the relationships between climate change and hydrologic change, especially potential changes in the flood hazard as climate changes. Past research provided details of the history of flooding in the Eastern Townships. Most recently his research examined the influence of climate change on the wine industry in Quebec. He also has a research interest in glacial environments and is conducting a long-term monitoring project of a glacier in the Canadian Rocky Mountains.

Publications

Jones, N.K. 2012. The Influence of Recent Climate Change on Wine Regions in Quebec, Canada, Journal of Wine Research, available online April 20.

Jones, N.K. 2008. An Overview of Recent Climate Change and Streamflow in the Massawippi River Basin. Journal of Eastern Townships Studies, 32-33, 23-38.

Jones, N.K. 2008. On the Impact of Recent Climate Change on Seasonal Floods—a case study from a river basin in southern Quebec. Canadian Water Resources Journal, 33(1), 55-72.

Jones, N.K., 2006. The flash flood at Lennoxville, October 14-17, 2005: The physical geography. Journal of Eastern Townships Studies, in press.

Jones, N.K. 2004. An Analysis of the Massawippi Floods of 1982 and 1994. Canadian Water Resources Journal, 29(1), 73-84.

Jones, N.K. 2003. A History of Flood Events in Southern Quebec, Canada. In: Palaeofloods, Historical Data and Climatic Variability: Applications in Flood Risk Assessment (V.R. Thorndycraft, G. Benito, M. Barriendos and M.C. Llasat, eds.), Proceedings of the PHEFRA Workshop, Barcelona, 16-19 October, 2002, 119-124.

Jones, N.K. 2002. Flooding in the Massawippi Basin during the 20th Century. Journal of Eastern Townships Studies, 20, 107-122.

Jones, N.K. and Rowbotham, D. 2001. Glaciological and Historical Analyses at the Boundary Glacier, Alberta. Western Geography, 10/11, 30-42.

Jones, N.K. 1998. A recent history of flooding in the Massawippi drainage basin. Journal of Eastern Townships Studies 13, 41-57.

Jones, N.K. 1996. The internal character and formation of the Battery Point drumlin, Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia. The Canadian Geographer 40(3), 273-280.

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Dr. Elisabeth Levac

Associate Professor

Dr. Levac has a Ph.D. in earth sciences from Dalhousie University, a B.Sc. in physical geography and a M. Sc. in earth sciences from the Université du Québec à Montréal. She worked as a post-doctoral fellow for the Halifax Pollen and Spores Monitoring Experiment at St. Mary's University and is now applying this knowledge to monitor pollen and spores in downtown Sherbrooke.…Contact Information and full bio
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2499

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Dr. Levac has a Ph.D. in earth sciences from Dalhousie University, a B.Sc. in physical geography and a M. Sc. in earth sciences from the Université du Québec à Montréal. She worked as a post-doctoral fellow for the Halifax Pollen and Spores Monitoring Experiment at St. Mary’s University and is now applying this knowledge to monitor pollen and spores in downtown Sherbrooke. Dr. Levac conducts research in paleoceanography and paleoclimatology, more specifically on abrupt climate events such as the Younger Dryas and the 8.2 ka event, and on pollen monitoring and allergies. She is adjunct professor at McGill and at the Université de Sherbrooke. She is member of the Global Environmental and Climate Change Centre at McGill.

Website: http://www.elisabethlevac.com

Publications

Levac, E., Lewis, Stretch,V., Duchesne, K., Neulieb, T., 2015. Evidence for meltwater drainage via the St. Lawrence River Valley in marine cores from the Laurentian Channel at the time of the Younger Dryas. Global Planetary Change 130: 47-75. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2015.04.002.

Neulieb, T., Levac, E., Southon, J., Lewis, C.F.M., Chmura, G.L.., Pendea, F., 2013. Potential pitfalls of pollen dating, Radiocarbon, vol. 55, Nr 2–3, p 1142-1155. 10.2458/azu_js_rc.55.16274

Khan, A.H., Levac, E., Chmura, G.L. 2013. Future sea surface temperatures in large marine ecosystems of the Northwest Atlantic. ICES (International Council for the Exploration of the Sea) Journal of Marine Science; vol. 70, no 5, p. 915-921. doi:10.1093/icesjms/fst002

Levac, E. 2012 International Literature Review of Prediction Methods of Airborne Pollen Concentrations. Environment Canada Research Contract K4B20-11-0422. March 2012. 110 pages.

Lewis, C.F.M., Miller, A.A.L., Levac, E., Piper, D.J.W., Sonnichsen, G.V. 2012. Lake Agassiz outburst age and routing by Labrador Current and the 8.2 cal ka cold event. Quaternary International, vol. 260, pages 83-97. doi:10.1016/j.quaint.2011.08.023

Levac, E., 2011. Climatic and environmental change: monitoring, adaptation, action: The new Multi-Scale Climate and Environmental Change (MUSCLE) Research Cluster. Journal of Eastern Townships Studies, vol. 37, pages 23-42.

Levac, E., Stretch, V., Sandercombe, S., Ashley, A., 2011. A pollen calendar for the main allergenic pollen types in the borough of Lennoxville (Sherbrooke), Quebec. Journal of Eastern Townships Studies, vol. 37, pages 43-62.

Levac, E., Lewis, C.F.M., Miller, A.A.L. 2011. The Impact of the Final Lake Agassiz Flood Recorded in Northeast Newfoundland and Northern Scotian Shelves Based on Century-Scale Palynological Data. Abrupt Climate Change: Mechanisms, Patterns, and Impacts Geophysical Monograph Series 193. pages 139-159. doi:10.1029/2010GM001051.

Anderson, T.W., Levac, E., Lewis, C.F.M., 2007. Cooling in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and estuary region at 9.7 to 7.2 14C ka: palynological response to the PBO and 8.2 ka cal BP cold events, Laurentide Ice Sheet air mass circulation and enhanced freshwater runoff. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, volume 246, pages 75-100. Special issue: Late Quaternary North American meltwater and floods to the Atlantic Ocean: evidence and impacts.

Mudie, P.J., Rochon, A., Prins, M., Soenarjo, D., Troelstra, S., Levac, E., Scott, D.B., Roncaglia, L., Kuijpers, A., 2006. Late Pleistocene-Holocene marine geology of Nares Strait: palaeoceanography from foraminifer and dinoflagellate cysts, sedimentology and stable isotopes. Polarforschung, volume 74, pages 169-183.

DeLazzer, A., Levac, E., Waugh, D.L., Richardson, D.H.S., 2006. Report on the Halifax experimental pollen and spores forecast program for the summer of 2005. Meteorological Service of Canada, Atlantic Region, Science Report Series 2006-09. 60 pages

Mudie, P.J., Rochon, A., Levac, E., 2005. Arctic catastrophes: rapid sea ice changes in the Canadian Arctic and the impact on humans. Geological Society Special Publication “Environmental Catastrophes and Recovery in the Holocene” edited by Iain Stewart and Suzanne Leroy. Environmental Archaeology, vol. 10, 113-126.

Levac, E., 2003. Palynological records from Bay of Islands, Newfoundland: direct correlation of Holocene paleoceanographic and climatic changes. Palynology, vol. 27, 135-154.

Mudie, P.J., Rochon, A. and Levac, E. 2002. Palynological records of red tides in Canada: past trends and implications for the future. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, vol. 180, p. 159-186.

Levac, E., 2001. High resolution Holocene palynological records from the Scotian Shelf. Marine Micropaleontology, vol. 43, p.179-197.

Levac, E., de Vernal, A., Blake, W. Jr. 2001. Holocene palynology of cores from the North Water Polynya, Baffin Bay. Journal of Quaternary Science, vol. 16, p. 353-363.

de Vernal, A., Henry, M., … Levac, E., et al. 2001. Dinoflagellate cyst assemblages as tracers of sea-surface conditions in the northern North Atlantic, Arctic and sub-Arctic seas: the new “n = 677” data base and its application for quantitative paleoceanographic reconstructions. Journal of Quaternary Science, vol. 16, p. 681-698.

Cape Roberts Science Team, 1998. Initial report on CRP-1, Cape Roberts Project, Antarctica. Terra Antarctica, vol. 5.

Levac, E. and de Vernal, A. 1997. Postglacial changes of terrestrial and marine environments along the Labrador coast: palynological evidences from cores 91-045-005 and 91-045-006, Cartwright Saddle, Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, vol. 34, p. 1358-1365.

Photo of Dr. Matthew Peros

Dr. Matthew Peros

Associate Professor

Dr. Peros received his Ph.D. in geography from the University of Toronto, his M.Sc. from York University (also in geography), and his B.Sc. in archaeological sciences and geography from the University of Toronto. His graduate work focused on environmental change and prehistoric human adaptations in Cuba. Following the completion of his Ph.D., Dr. Peros moved to the Laboratory for Paleoclimatology and Climatology at the University of Ottawa, where he researched arctic climate change under the direction of Dr.…Contact Information and full bio
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2783

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Dr. Peros received his Ph.D. in geography from the University of Toronto, his M.Sc. from York University (also in geography), and his B.Sc. in archaeological sciences and geography from the University of Toronto. His graduate work focused on environmental change and prehistoric human adaptations in Cuba. Following the completion of his Ph.D., Dr. Peros moved to the Laboratory for Paleoclimatology and Climatology at the University of Ottawa, where he researched arctic climate change under the direction of Dr. Konrad Gajewski. Dr. Peros’s current research involves studying the history of hurricane impacts in the Caribbean, and prehistoric environmental-human interactions in North America. He also serves as Vice-President of the Canadian Quaternary Association (CANQUA) and he is the Director of the graduate-level Micro-program in Climate Change at Bishop’s University.

Climate and Environmental Change Research Laboratory website.

Research

Dr. Peros is a broadly trained physical geographer working at the interface between the climatological, ecological, and archaeological sciences. His research seeks to answer fundamental questions within two broad areas: (1) what have been the driving forces behind climate and landscape change during the Late Quaternary? and (2), how has the natural environment constrained/provided opportunities for cultural and biological change? To address questions in these areas, he uses a field- and laboratory-based approach, integrating information derived from geological (e.g., sedimentological, geochemical) and paleoecological (e.g., palynological) investigations with archaeological data. At present, his regional specializations include eastern Canada, the Caribbean, and northeastern China.

Publications

Peros, M.C., Collins, S., Agosta G’Meiner, A., Reinhardt, E., and F. M. Pupo. (2017). Multistage 8.2 kyr event revealed through high-resolution XRF core scanning of Cuban sinkhole sediments. Geophysical Research Letters, 44, doi:10.1002/2017GL074369

Oliva, F., Peros, M.C., and Viau, A. (2017). A review of the spatial distribution of and analytical techniques used in paleotempestological studies in the North Atlantic Basin. Progress in Physical Geography, 1:1-20.

Peros, M.C., Gregory, B.R., Matos, F., Reinhardt, E.G., and Desloges, J.P. (2015). Late Holocene record of lagoon evolution, climate change, and hurricane strikes from south-eastern Cuba. The Holocene, 25: 1483-1497.

Munoz, S., Gajewski, K., Peros, M.C. (2010). Synchronous environmental and cultural change in the prehistory of the northeastern United States. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107: 22008-22013.

Peros, M.C., Gajewski, K. (2008). Holocene climate and vegetation change on Victoria Island, western Canadian Arctic. Quaternary Science Reviews, 27: 235-249.

Contract Faculty

Photo of Prof. Bruno Courtemanche

Prof. Bruno Courtemanche

Contract Faculty

Sensor and sensor platform design, Light scattering, data clustering, remote sensing oceanography, remote sensing of the cryosphere. Currently working on his PhD, M. Courtemanche earned his Bachelor’s and Masters degrees at Université de Sherbrooke. His current research focuses on underwater light scattering and microwave scattering. Co-owner and founder of RS Conception inc., M. Courtemanche is working with federal agencies, Sherbrooke University and the private sector to create the next cutting edge sensors and sensors platforms.…Contact Information and full bio
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2494

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Sensor and sensor platform design, Light scattering, data clustering, remote sensing oceanography, remote sensing of the cryosphere.

Currently working on his PhD, M. Courtemanche earned his Bachelor’s and Masters degrees at Université de Sherbrooke. His current research focuses on underwater light scattering and microwave scattering. Co-owner and founder of RS Conception inc., M. Courtemanche is working with federal agencies, Sherbrooke University and the private sector to create the next cutting edge sensors and sensors platforms.

Currently teaches:

  • ESG 262: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
  • ESG 362: Advanced Geographic Information Systems
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Dr. Albert Haller

Contract Faculty

Currently teaches:
  • ESG 162: Canada: A Nation of Regions
  • ESG 339: The Canadian Arctic
  • ESG 340: The Circumpolar North
Contact Information and full bio
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2494

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Currently teaches:

  • ESG 162: Canada: A Nation of Regions
  • ESG 339: The Canadian Arctic
  • ESG 340: The Circumpolar North
Photo of Dr. Courtice G. Rose

Dr. Courtice G. Rose

Faculty – Retired, Professor Emeritus

B.A., M.A. (Western), M.A. PhD. (Clark University) Currently teaches:
  • ESG 348: Urban Planning
  • ESG 366: Ethical Perspectives on Environmental Problems
Contact Information and full bio
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2594

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B.A., M.A. (Western), M.A. PhD. (Clark University)

Currently teaches:

  • ESG 348: Urban Planning
  • ESG 366: Ethical Perspectives on Environmental Problems
Photo of Dr. David Smith

Dr. David Smith

Adjunct Professor

Dr. Smith holds a Ph.D. in Mathematics from Université de Sherbrooke and has been working as a contract faculty at Bishop's University since 2008. Over these 9 years, he has taught a wide variety of math courses, including the math business courses such as MAT 190, MAT 193, MAT 195, MAT 196 and MAT 197.…Contact Information and full bio
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2083

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Dr. Smith holds a Ph.D. in Mathematics from Université de Sherbrooke and has been working as a contract faculty at Bishop’s University since 2008. Over these 9 years, he has taught a wide variety of math courses, including the math business courses such as MAT 190, MAT 193, MAT 195, MAT 196 and MAT 197. Since 2010, he is one of the co-organizor of the international Sherbrooke-Bishop’s annual Meeting in the Representation Theory of Algebra. He is also occasionally a referee for some scientific journals and has also been a reviewer for the important collection Mathematical Reviews. Currently, he also co-supervise three Ph.D. students in Mathematics, all based at Université de Sherbrooke.

Research

His main interest research interest is Algebra, and more precisely Representation Theory of Algebras.

Funding

Since 2010, he holds an NSERC (Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada) research grant: $150,000 over 8 years.

Publications

Since 2003, he has been the author or co-author of 12 published research papers.

Published Papers

1. I. Assem, G. Dupont, R. Schiffler and D. Smith, Friezes, strings and cluster variables, Glasg. Math. J. 54 (2012), no. 1, 27-60.

2. A. Buan, O. Iyama, I. Reiten and D. Smith, Mutation of cluster-tilting objects and potentials, Amer. J. Math., 133 (2011), no. 4, 835-887.

3. I. Assem, C. Reutenauer and D. Smith, Friezes, Adv. Math. 225 (2010), no. 6, 3134-3165.

4. J.C. Bustamante, J. Dionne and D. Smith, (Co)homology theories for oriented algebras, Comm. Algebra, 27 (2009), no.5, 1516-1544.

5. J. Dionne, M. Lanzilotta and D. Smith, Skew group algebras of piecewise hereditary algebras are piecewise hereditary, J. Pure Appl. Algebra, 213 (2009), 241-249.

6. D. Smith, On tilting modules over cluster-tilted algebras, Illinois J. Math. 52 (2008), no. 4, 1223-1247.

7. D. Smith, Almost laura algebras, J. Algebra, 319 (2008), no. 1, 432-456.

8. M. Lanzilotta and D. Smith, Laura algebras and quasi-directed components, Colloq. Math., 105 (2006), no. 2, 179-196.

9. J. Dionne and D. Smith, Articulations of algebras and their homological properties, J. Algebra Appl., 5 (2006), no. 3 1-15.

10. I. Assem, F. U. Coelho, M. Lanzilotta, D. Smith and S. Trepode, Algebras determined by their left and right parts. Algebraic structures and their representations, 13-47, Contemp. Math., 376, Amer. Math. Soc., Providence, RI, 2005.

11. D. Smith, On generalized standard Auslander-Reiten components having only finitely many non-directing modules, J. Algebra, 279 (2004), no. 2, 493-513.

12. J-C. Bustamante, J. Dionne and D. Smith, Ordonnés de chaînes et algèbres d’incidence, Ann. Sci. Math. Québec 27 (2003), no. 1, 1-11.

Other publications

13. D. Smith, Algèbres de type laura, algèbres de groupes gauches et groups de (co)homologie, Ph.D. Thesis (2006), Université de Sherbrooke.

14. D. Smith, Articulation d’algèbres et propriétés homologiques, Master Thesis (2003), Université de Sherbrooke.

CV

Environmental Science Program Faculty

Our B.Sc. Environmental Science program depends on courses and contributions from the following faculty members in the Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics:

Photo of Dr. Valerio Faraoni

Dr. Valerio Faraoni

Full Professor

Valerio Faraoni earned a BSc in Physics (Laurea in Fisica) at the University of Pavia, Italy, and an MSc and PhD (1991) in Astrophysics under the supervision of Prof. George F.R. Ellis at the International School for Advanced Studies in Trieste, Italy (www.sissa.it). He has held various research and teaching appointments at the University of Victoria, B.C., the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, India, the Free University of Brussels, Belgium, and the University of Northern British Columbia.…Contact Information and full bio
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2490

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Valerio Faraoni earned a BSc in Physics (Laurea in Fisica) at the University of Pavia, Italy, and an MSc and PhD (1991) in Astrophysics under the supervision of Prof. George F.R. Ellis at the International School for Advanced Studies in Trieste, Italy (http://www.sissa.it). He has held various research and teaching appointments at the University of Victoria, B.C., the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, India, the Free University of Brussels, Belgium, and the University of Northern British Columbia. He came to Bishop’s University in 2005, where he is currently an Associate Professor in the physics department.

Research

Theoretical Cosmology: Dark Energy and Modified Gravity

Theoretical cosmology studies the dynamics, origin, evolution, and fate of the universe, and the formation of structures (galaxies, galaxy clusters, and superclusters) in it. In 1998 it was discovered, by studying distant supernovae, that the expansion of the universe is accelerated. Many theoretical models have been proposed in order to explain this shocking discovery and they mostly fall into two classes: dark energy and modified gravity. Dark energy models assume that Einstein’s theory of gravity (general relativity) is valid and that a mysterious form of dark energy of unknown nature permeates the universe and makes up 70% of its energy content. This dark energy must necessarily have exotic properties, such as a negative pressure. The current observational data seem to require an even more negative pressure and more exotic energy (called phantom energy), which may cause the universe to end at a finite time in the future in a Big Rip singularity (the end of time), in which all bound objects-galaxies, planets, humans, atoms-are ripped apart by increasing gravitational forces. If phantom energy is really fuelling the cosmic acceleration, we probably have to abandon Einstein’s general relativity in favour of alternative gravity theories such as, for example, scalar-tensor gravity, a generalization of Einstein’s theory motivated by string/M-theories. The latter attempt to unify gravity with the other three fundamental forces, a goal known as “the holy grail of theoretical physics”.

The second class of models, modified gravity, does not require exotic dark energy but instead modifies Einstein’s relativity with corrections that only affect large (cosmological) scales.

Dr. Faraoni’s research explores both classes of models, trying to fully understand their dynamics, explain the cosmic acceleration, develop models that are theoretically consistent and compatible with available experiments, study their predictions (e.g., will the universe accelerate forever? Will it end in a Big Rip?) and related issues such as the production of gravitational waves, or the accretion of phantom energy onto black holes or wormholes. Long term goals include the development of the correct theory of gravity (it is possible that departures from Einstein’s gravity are unobservable at the small Solar System scales but are already observed in the cosmic acceleration), finding out if dark energy actually exists and, if so, determining precisely its strange properties, understanding the early universe and obtaining information, otherwise inaccessible on Earth, on the high energy physics that left an imprint in the cosmic microwave background and in the distribution of galaxies and galaxy clusters.

Other recent interests include the study of black holes embedded in a cosmological background and the foundations and possible violations of the Equivalence Principle (the basis of relativistic gravity) in high energy physics.

Dr. Faraoni collaborates with various researchers worldwide on the subjects above and is involved in establishing an international research network on modified gravity.

Details on his research and an up-to-date list of publications can be found at http://www.slac.stanford.edu

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Dr. Michael Richardson

Associate Professor – Department Chairperson

Dr. Michael Richardson is Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences. He teaches a variety of courses including Introductory Biology, Vertebrate Zoology, Freshwater Biology, Evolution, The Life of Fishes, Animal Behaviour, and Field Biology. (add link to Academic Calendar) He received both his undergraduate and graduate training in Wildlife Biology from the Macdonald Campus of McGill University.…Contact Information and full bio
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2460

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Dr. Michael Richardson is Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences. He teaches a variety of courses including Introductory Biology, Vertebrate Zoology, Freshwater Biology, Evolution, The Life of Fishes, Animal Behaviour, and Field Biology. (add link to Academic Calendar) He received both his undergraduate and graduate training in Wildlife Biology from the Macdonald Campus of McGill University. His Master’s and Doctoral research involved using the common goldfish (Carassius auratus) as a model for better understanding how exotic fish become established and the impacts they have on small lakes and ponds.

He has supervised a number of undergraduate honours projects involved in behavioural ecology, including studies in testicular adduction in Howler monkeys, anti-predator vigilance in Harbour seals, age related fecundity in Tree Swallows, and the factors affecting the reproductive performance of Red-breasted Mergansers.

Research

Dr. Richardson’s main current research efforts are directed towards a joint project with the Montreal Biosphere into the health of local fish communities and a study of the ambistomid salamanders in the Johnville Bog.

Biosphere Freshwater Fish Network

The Freshwater Fish Network represents a community-based organization of over 70 partners including schools, NGOs, municipalities, and private corporations, all dedicated to preserving the ecological integrity of the St. Lawrence River and the Great Lakes. One of the key aspects of this project is the data collected by as many as 25 schools along the St. Lawrence during supervised sampling trips organized by the Biosphere. Dr. Richardson is attempting to use this data as a means of monitoring the health of fish communities within the St. Lawrence.

Acid Bogs and Salamanders

The Johnville Bog, located just ten minutes from the Bishop’s campus, represents one of the best preserved examples of an acid bog habitat in Eastern Quebec. During an inventory of the amphibian species in 2001, a large number of yellow-spotted (Ambystoma maculatum) and blue-spotted salamander (A. laterale) eggs were found within the three main ponds that make up the bog. Although this species is common in the region, the finding was surprising, given that the acidity of the bogs (pH 3.4-3.8) is significantly lower than the lethal limit for the eggs and larvae of North American salamanders (pH 4.0-4.5). This raises the possibility that the bogs are acting like ecological sinks or traps, drawing in healthy adults from the surrounding “source” populations into the apparently suitable breeding habitats, only to have these young fail to successfully develop. The objective of this study is therefore to try and understand the dynamics of both the salamander species in the Johnville Bog.

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Dr. Jade Savage

Full Professor

Dr. Jade Savage completed her bachelor's degree in Biology in 1998 and her PhD in Entomology in 2004 at McGill University. She joined the Department of Biological Sciences at Bishop's University in July 2004. She has travelled extensively, throughout North America and abroad, to take part in conferences and research field expeditions in Canada, the United States, Costa Rica, Australia, and Sweden.…Contact Information and full bio
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2362

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Dr. Jade Savage completed her bachelor’s degree in Biology in 1998 and her PhD in Entomology in 2004 at McGill University. She joined the Department of Biological Sciences at Bishop’s University in July 2004. She has travelled extensively, throughout North America and abroad, to take part in conferences and research field expeditions in Canada, the United States, Costa Rica, Australia, and Sweden. Dr. Savage was recently awarded four grants from NSERC and FQRNT totalling $108,485 to pursue her work on the systematics and biodiversity of Diptera (true flies).

She is an adjunct professor at the University of Manitoba and an emeritus curator at the Lyman Museum of McGill University and is currently co-supervising two M.Sc. projects through these institutions. The first, by Amy Moores, investigates the impact of patch size on the Diptera fauna of peat bogs of southern Quebec and northern Vermont. The second project, by Anais Renaud, is looking at changes in the distribution and composition of the Diptera fauna of Churchill (Manitoba) over the last century.

The last few decades have seen a rapid increase of interest in conservation biology. While scientists now realize the pressing need to address the rapid loss of biological diversity, they are not always equipped with the proper tools to do so. Vascular plants and vertebrates have generally received most of the attention in terms of conservation efforts, while other species-rich taxa such as the insects have been largely ignored. The main reason for this exclusion is that insects are still lagging much behind most other groups in terms of taxonomic expertise. In an age where total species richness is often the reference measure driving conservation and management efforts, it is quite ironic that the most speciose group of animals should be excluded from a majority of biodiversity studies. In an attempt to remedy this taxonomic impediment, Dr. Savage carries out research on the systematics and biodiversity of the order Diptera.

Her research program aims at documenting the systematics and biodiversity of muscoid Diptera (house flies and relatives) in different target habitats, using a variety of analytical and conceptual approach. Field collections in south eastern Quebec and Ontario and in the arctic regions of North America and Eurasia will allow Dr. Savage to fill some gaps in the distribution record of many species, yield large numbers of species including some new to science, and document biological diversity in some of the most understudied ecosystems of the northern hemisphere. The main contribution of her research program will be to increase knowledge of muscoid Diptera systematics through phylogenetic analyses and the description of new species; produce identification keys allowing non-specialists to identify specimens; and compile data on the ecology and biodiversity of Diptera.

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Dr. Brad Willms

Associate Professor – Environmental Science Program Chairperson

Chair of the Sports Studies program Dr. Willms is not only a mathematics professor; he is also passionate about sports. Dr. Willms serve as the academic advisor for Sports Studies students.Contact Information and full bio
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2404

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Chair of the Sports Studies program

Dr. Willms is not only a mathematics professor; he is also passionate about sports. Dr. Willms serve as the academic advisor for Sports Studies students.

Photo of Dr. Dale J. Wood

Dr. Dale J. Wood

Associate Professor

Dr. Wood is Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Bishop's University and Adjunct Professor at Université de Sherbrooke. He earned his Bachelor of Science and PhD in Chemistry at University of New Brunswick. His primary field of research is main-group inorganic chemistry. Chemistry professor Dale Wood has inspired students from various disciplines to enter his lab and study the science of brewing.…Contact Information and full bio
Phone: 819-822-9600 ext. 2369

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Dr. Wood is Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Bishop’s University and Adjunct Professor at Université de Sherbrooke. He earned his Bachelor of Science and PhD in Chemistry at University of New Brunswick. His primary field of research is main-group inorganic chemistry.

Chemistry professor Dale Wood has inspired students from various disciplines to enter his lab and study the science of brewing. Over the years, his individual course offering has grown into what will become Eastern Canada’s first academic brewery, opening in Fall 2015.

Research

Dr. Dale Wood, Chemistry professor and brewing aficionado

Dale Wood Brewing aficionado

Dr. Wood’s unique project has attracted a multitude of attention,  but more importantly, it has sparked a unique exchange between he and his students. “We have business and marketing majors involved with the brewery; they’re working on marketing projects with a brewery in mind,” explains Dr. Wood. “Those students will bring into the lab things I don’t know, and contribute in ways that are going to allow them to apply their backgrounds to something new, something practical, something experiential.”

“We sell this idea to prospective students:  you come to Bishop’s, we’re going to develop your ideas to be all they can be, but it’s not just the students who get this advantage, it’s the professors too. I don’t think I could have done this anywhere else; the interdisciplinary nature of this fits perfectly with the liberal education model here at Bishop’s.”

Students in Bishop's brewing program

Dr. Wood’s sees many similarities between his role as an academic and the brewmaster. “Professors, like brewmasters, are craftspeople who gather together raw materials and create conditions that encourage transformative processes – with sometimes ineffable results…the light bulb moments in our students when they finally combine their preparation, hard work, and learning with a touch of magic and a flash of insight to make sense of the world around them in a new way,” he says.

He adds: “We encourage our students to explore and make sure their ideas are known; I think that’s the reason this kind of project can work so well. I’m not isolated in a building on campus that’s spread out across an entire city; I’m exposed to the entire community. That is liberal education; it’s as much about the profs learning as the students.

“I can’t imagine being anywhere else.”

Publications

Boyle, P. D., Cameron, T. S., Decken, A., Passmore, J, and Wood, D. J. 1997. Phosphorus, Sulfur, and Silicon 124 & 125, 549.

Cameron, T. S., Decken, A., Fang, M., Parsons, S., Passmore, J., and Wood, D. J. 1999. Journal of the Chemical Society, Chemical Communications 1801.

Berces, A., Enright, G.D., McLaurin, G.E., Morton, J.R., Preston, K.F., Passmore, J. and Wood, D. J. 1999. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry 37, 353.

Arp, H.P.H., Decken, A., Passmore, J. and Wood, D. J. 2000. Inorganic Chemistry 39 (9), 1840.